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    Sale 11899

    Sculpture

    13 April 2016, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 26

    A BRONZE FIGURE OF JUPITER

    NORTH ITALIAN, POSSIBLY MANTUAN OR PADUAN, FIRST QUARTER 16TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A BRONZE FIGURE OF JUPITER
    NORTH ITALIAN, POSSIBLY MANTUAN OR PADUAN, FIRST QUARTER 16TH CENTURY
    On a later octagonal ebonized wood base
    12 in. (30.7 cm.) high; 16½ in. (42 cm.) high, overall


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    Jupiter's left hand - which would have held a thunderbolt - is raised and his right hand would previously have held an orb or eaglet. The pose is based on an ancient Jupiter type, known in a number of examples in bronze. The figure’s outstretched left arm and covering drapery is surely inspired by that of the ancient marble Apollo Belvedere, installed in the Cortile del Belvedere in Rome in 1503. The elaborately crinkled drapery of the Apollo must have given rise to Jupiter’s mantle here. This is a particularly distinctive feature of the present bronze, in which the artist has made use of the tensile strength of the medium, pushing the folds out into space, a feat that would have been difficult - if not impossible - in marble.
    The present bronze is known in one other cast, which was formerly in the Castiglione collection and is now in Budapest. The Budapest cast is virtually identical but appears to be slightly less refined in the details. The model has previously been called a general, emperor or Roman orator in the past, but was correctly identified as Jupiter by Eszlary and Koronknay in 1978 (loc. cit.).
    Camins speculated whether the artist of the present bronze may have seen a preliminary model of Cellini’s now lost colossal figure of Jupiter in silver of 1541-1545, however the stylistic differences between the present bronze and Cellini’s work make this connection appear unlikely. In his autobiography, Cellini noted that the right arm of his Jupiter was raised, which is the opposite of the present model. It is perhaps more likely that the artist was versed in the classicizing works of Andrea Riccio (1470-1532; Bacchi and Giacomelli, loc. cit.). The heavy cast of the bronze, with traces of dark lacquer, suggests a north Italian facture of the early sixteenth century.

    Provenance

    Guido von Rhò, Vienna, by 1908.
    Baroness Maria de Reitzes-Marienwert.
    Collections of Baroness Maria de Reitzes-Marienwert; Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, 1 May 1948, lot 305.
    Christie's, London, 19 December 1977, lot 130.


    Pre-Lot Text

    Property from the Abbott-Guggenheim Collection


    Literature

    E.W. Braun, Die Bronzen der Sammlung Guido von Rhó, Vienna, 1908, p. 16, no. XIII.
    M. Schwartz, ed., European Sculpture from the Abbott Guggenheim Collection, New York, 2008, pp. 26-27, no. 3.

    COMPARATIVE LITERATURE:
    L. Planiscig, La Collezione Camillo Castiglione, Venice, 1925, XXXVI.
    Budapest, Kunstgewerbemuseum, Ausstellung von werken der Kleinplastik 10.-19. Jahrhunderts, E. Eszlary and E. Koroknay, 1978, no. 103.
    Acta historiae artium Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae, Budapest, Tomus XXVI, 1980, fig. 7.
    Trent, Museo Diocesano Tridentino, Rinascimento e passione per l'antico: Andrea Riccio e il suo tempo, A. Bacchi and L. Giacomelli eds, 5 Jul. - 2 Nov. 2008, no. 94.


    Exhibited

    San Francisco, The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes from the Abbott Guggenheim Collection, 3 Mar. – 11 Sep. 1988, L. Camins ed., pp. 71-73, no. 23.