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    Sale 7545

    A Town House in Mayfair

    20 November 2008, London, King Street

  • Lot 649

    A FRENCH BRONZE GROUP OF A POINTER LOOKING AT A PARTRIDGE

    CAST FROM THE MODEL BY JULES MOIGNIEZ, LATE 19TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A FRENCH BRONZE GROUP OF A POINTER LOOKING AT A PARTRIDGE
    CAST FROM THE MODEL BY JULES MOIGNIEZ, LATE 19TH CENTURY
    The naturalistic base signed J. Moigniez
    7 in. (18 cm.) high; 12 in. (30 cm.) wide; 4¾ in. (12 cm.) deep


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    Jules Moigniez (d. 1894) was born at Senlis in 1835, studied under Comoléra and made his debut at the Salon in 1855 with a plaster group of a Setter seizing a Pheasant. Awarded a medal at the 1862 Great Exibition in London, Moigniez was fashionable in Britain and it is estimated that up to half of his output was exported. Moigniez père was a metal-gilder who established a bronze foundry in 1857 to cast his son's works. The plaster group of 'A Pointer looking at a Partridge' was exhibited at the 1855 Exposition Universelle.

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    Acquired from Victor Franses, London


    Pre-Lot Text

    FRENCH ANIMALIER BRONZES

    From the 1830s the term 'Animalier' came to refer to a school of sculptors of French origin which attempted to portray animals and birds as they really are. This more realistic, less academic, style of modelling encompassed all manner of subjects, including humble goats and cattle, game, lions and tigers, to equestrian groups and, as in the majority of the examples offered here, sporting dogs. The finest Animaliers sought to imbue their work with the emotions and characters of their subjects which, whilst avoiding sentimentality, gives their sculpture a remarkably animated quality as evident in the examples offered here.