• Architectural Heritage: The Ad auction at Christies

    Sale 5458

    Architectural Heritage: The Adrian and Suzy Puddy Collection

    10 March 2010, London, South Kensington

  • Lot 99

    A PAIR OF FRENCH PAINTED CAST-IRON MODELS OF FLORENTINE PAGES

    CIRCA 1882, AFTER EDOUARD-CHARLES-MARIE HOUSSIN (1847-1917)

    Price Realised  

    A PAIR OF FRENCH PAINTED CAST-IRON MODELS OF FLORENTINE PAGES
    CIRCA 1882, AFTER EDOUARD-CHARLES-MARIE HOUSSIN (1847-1917)
    Each holding a staff, inscribed 'E.HOUSSIN/1882', re-painted
    81 in. (206 cm.) high (2)


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    Born at Douai in 1847, Edouard Houssin was a pupil of Millet and Jouffroy. From 1873 to 1914, he exhibited at the Salon where he was awarded several Medals. As well as portait busts and genre and classical groups, Houssin also executed many monuments and memorials in France.

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium, which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.
    This lot will be removed to an off-site warehouse at the close of business on the day of sale - 2 weeks free storage


    Pre-Lot Text

    CAST-IRON IN THE 19TH CENTURY

    The casting on such a large scale as these Florentine Page Boys and the Youths seated on Mythical Beasts (lot 100) was made possible by the rapid developments in cast-iron production in the 19th century as a result of the Industrial Revolution. Combined with the simultaneous burgeoning of a new middle class, the impetus for a dramatic expansion in the application of cast-iron goods resulted in a proliferation of iron foundries across Europe and America which thrived on the production of everything from inkstands to railway stations. The use of cast-iron for garden ornament became particularly widespread from the mid 19th century at this time, as the possibilities for its mass-production at a fraction of the cost of bronze made it the material of choice for outdoor statuary, figural lighting, fountains and vases.
    Nowhere was the popularity and use of cast-iron ornament greater than in France, where by the second half of the 19th century two foundries in particular had come to dominate production both for the home market and for export. The more important of these was Val D'Osne. Founded in 1835 the company developed rapidly, absorbing smaller foundries in the Haute-Marne area east of Paris. Smaller than Val D'Osne but nevertheless a major player in the manufacture of cast-iron was the firm of A. A. Durenne, established in 1847 at Sommevoire (see lots 15, 205 and 206).