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    Sale 12454

    The Dani & Anna Ghigo Collection: Part II: Oriental Carpets, European Furniture, Works of Art & Tapestries, Chinese, Japanese & South East Asian Works of Art

    12 May 2016, London, King Street

  • Lot 502

    A LOUIS XV CHINOISERIE VERDURE 'TRIPTYCH' TAPESTRY

    AUBUSSON, FIRST HALF 18TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A LOUIS XV CHINOISERIE VERDURE 'TRIPTYCH' TAPESTRY
    AUBUSSON, FIRST HALF 18TH CENTURY
    Woven in silks and wools, depicting an exotic fantasy landscape centred by lions with a lake and waterfall beyond, within a simulated scalloped picture frame border
    9 ft. 5 in. x 19 ft. 3 in. (287 x 583 cm.)


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    Giuseppe Volpi (1877-1947) was a leading Italian industrialist and diplomat who is credited with bringing electricity to northern Italy in 1903, serving as Italy’s Finance Minister (1925-1928) and founding the Venice Film Festival in 1932. He was granted the title of Count of Misurata in 1920. Often referred to as the ‘last Doge’, he and his wife Nathalie (1899-1989), known as Lily, were at the centre of Italian fashionable society, famous for their glamourous parties and attended by Europe’s most influential politicians, artists and royalty, including The Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Winston Churchill, Cecile Beaton and Cole Porter.

    In 1939 they bought the grand Roman Palazzo Galloppi at 21 via del Quirinale which later became known as Palazzo Volpi. The palazzo was designed in the late 17th century by the architect and engraver Alessandro Specchi, who also designed the Spanish Steps. It sadly fell into disrepair having been plundered during the Second World War, but was later restored to its former magnificence by Countess Volpi in 1951. Its complete refurbishment was done with the flair and style synonymous with her name and the collection amassed at the Palazzo by the Count and Countess drew admiration throughout the 20th century. The majority of the collection was moved to storage in the late 20th century, remaining unseen for twenty-five years until being sold in 1998.

    Provenance

    Nathalie ('Lily') Volpi (1899-1989) and Giuseppe Volpi (1877-1947), 1st Count and Countess Volpi di Misurata, the Salone, Palazzo Volpi, Rome and by descent to
    Giovanni Volpi (b. 1938) 2nd Count Volpi di Misurata; sold Sotheby's, London, 16 December 1998, lot 20.