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    Sale 7574

    Thomas Hope & The Neoclassical Vision & The Collector of Collections

    24 April 2008, London, King Street

  • Lot 424

    A SOHO MYTHOLOGICAL TAPESTRY

    EARLY 18TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A SOHO MYTHOLOGICAL TAPESTRY
    EARLY 18TH CENTURY
    Woven in silks and wools, depicting four figures including Mercury accompanied by Jupiter's eagle, within a wooded landscape with a temple-like building to the right, in an egg-and-dart border and brown outer slip
    7 ft. 9 in. x 17 ft. (238 x 518 cm.)


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    This picturesque scene, inspired by the 'Banquets of the Gods', features the flourishing landscape around Mount Ida's slopes, where the Trojan Ganymede, guised as an eagle, was first glimpsed by Jupiter.

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    The Michael Winch Will Trust, Boughton Monchelsea Place, Kent, Christie's, South Kensington, 21 January 1998, lot 329.


    Pre-Lot Text

    Boughton Monchelsea Place dates back to the Norman Conquest and was given by William the Conqueror to his half-brother Odo, Bishop of Bayeux. It was then in the possession of the Montchensies, from whom the second part of the estate's name derives. It was Robert Rudston, who acquired Boughton Monchelsea in 1551, and was mainly responsible for the estate in its present form. Important remodelling and alterations were carried out circa 1800 following the acquisition of the estate by Ingram Rider in 1786. Gothic and romantic architecture and design being very much au goût du jour, the estate was 'gothicised' and the formal gardens removed. In 1903, it was acquired by George Winch.
    Some of the pieces and works of art came from other residences owned by the Winch family, such as Holcombe near Chatham, Morden Grange in Blackheath and Broomhall outside Horsham.