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    Sale 1417

    Rare Watches Including Nautilus 40 Part II

    14 November 2016, Geneva

  • Lot 84

    Jules Jürgensen. A very fine and rare 18K gold hunter case minute repeating split seconds chronograph keyless lever watch with Jurgensen's patented bow hand-setting mechanism.

    SIGNED JULES JÜRGENSEN, COPENHAGEN, NO. 15'172,

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    Jules Jürgensen. A very fine and rare 18K gold hunter case minute repeating split seconds chronograph keyless lever watch with Jurgensen's patented bow hand-setting mechanism.
    Signed Jules Jürgensen, Copenhagen, No. 15'172,
    MOVEMENT: manual, cal. 18''', 35 jewels, minute repeating with two hammers on two gongs
    DIAL: white enamel, Roman numerals, outer minute track, concentric red fifths of a second track, two subsidiary dials for 60 minutes register and constant seconds
    CASE: 18K gold, two round chronograph buttons and repeating slide in the band, hinged gold cuvette, 53.8 mm. diam.
    SIGNED: case, cuvette and movement signed and numbered, dial signed
    ACCOMPANIED BY: Copies of Jules Jürgensen’s original worksheets detailing the various parts, work done and charges as well as the names of the relevant worker


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    To the best of our knowledge the present watch has never before been offered in public. It is fully signed and furthermore preserved in superb condition with wonderfully crisp case and, most importantly for a collector, a perfect enamel dial.

    This watch, no. 15’172, is the last example of a series of three minute repeating split seconds hunter case watches, numbered 15’170-15’172, all made to the same specifications as detailed on the worksheet for no. 15’170. The copies of the worksheets confirm that the production of no. 15'172 was finished in 1906, total cost 1,548.30 Francs, an impressive amount for the period and underlining the high quality. It was sold to Veill & Cie. on 6 September 1906.

    The ingenious hand-setting system is Jürgensen’s own patent, to operate it the bow is pushed forward towards the dial as far as possible, turning the crown will now set the hands. When the bow is returned to its normal position the winding function can be resumed.

    An almost identical watch is illustrated in The Jurgensen Dynasty, John Knudsen, p. 281.

    Pre-Lot Text

    THE PROPERTY OF AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTOR