1 page, 4to, name of the pardon recipient accomplished in a clerical hand." /> LINCOLN, Abraham. Partly printed document signed ("Abraham Lincoln"), as President, Washington, D. C., 13 November 1863. <I>1 page, 4to, name of the pardon recipient accomplished in a clerical hand</I>.|
  • Christies auction house James Christie logo

    Sale 2265

    Americana: Printed and Manuscript, Including Abraham Lincoln's 1864 Victory Speech: The Original Handwritten Manuscript

    12 February 2009, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 32

    LINCOLN, Abraham. Partly printed document signed ("Abraham Lincoln"), as President, Washington, D. C., 13 November 1863. 1 page, 4to, name of the pardon recipient accomplished in a clerical hand.

    Price Realised  

    LINCOLN, Abraham. Partly printed document signed ("Abraham Lincoln"), as President, Washington, D. C., 13 November 1863. 1 page, 4to, name of the pardon recipient accomplished in a clerical hand.

    LESS THAN A WEEK BEFORE DELIVERING HIS GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, LINCOLN EXERCISES HIS ARTICLE II , SECTION 2 POWERS UNDER THE CONSTITUTION and orders the Secretary of State to affix the seal of the United States on a pardon for William Blauvelt." Lincoln liberally indulged this power throughout the war, usually on behalf of soldiers under penalty of death--he pardoned every single instance of a sentry sentenced to be shot for falling asleep on duty. But apart from humanitarian considerations he realized the importance of the pardon power as a reconciliation tool. He took to heart Hamilton's judgment in Federalist No. 74: "... in seasons of insurrection or rebellion, there are often critical moments, when a well-timed offer of pardon to the insurgents or rebels may restore the tranquility of the commonwealth."


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