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    Sale 1983

    19th Century Furniture, Sculpture, Works of Art And Ceramics

    9 April 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 30

    A COMMEMORATIVE SEVRES (SECOND REPUBLIC) MOTTLED-BLUE GROUND VASE AND COVER

    IRON-RED DORE MARK FOR 1887, BLACK LOZENGE MARK FOR 1886 AND INCISED POTTER'S MARK E C (18)85 II

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A COMMEMORATIVE SEVRES (SECOND REPUBLIC) MOTTLED-BLUE GROUND VASE AND COVER
    IRON-RED DORE MARK FOR 1887, BLACK LOZENGE MARK FOR 1886 AND INCISED POTTER'S MARK E C (18)85 II
    Of baluster form, the domed cover with large knop finial, the fluted body molded with bell-flowers, on a conforming socle molded with laurel leaves and gilt-bronze canted square base with the inscription LE GOUVERNEMENT DE LA RÉPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE A.M. WHITELAW-REID Minstre des Etats Unis d'Amerique EN SOUVENIR DE SA MISSION A PARIS 1889
    49½ in. (125.8 cm.) high


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    Whitelaw Reid (1837-1912) was a distinguished newspaperman, author and diplomat. His correspondence at the Cincinnati Gazette during the Civil War brought him to the notice of Horace Greeley, who made him managing editor of the New York Tribune in 1868. Following Greeley's death, Reid became editor-in-chief of the Tribune, and he continued control of the paper while serving as Ambassador to France from 1889-92. It would seem he throughly enjoyed his stay in Paris and remarked to the New York Times, 4 April 1892, that, "Life there is exceedingly pleasant at all times. It is the one city in the world organized for pleasure. Gratification of the musical, artistic, all of the aesthetic and social tastes can be found there in a degree not equaled in the civilized world to-day."

    Upon his return to the United States in 1892, he ran as the Vice Presidential candidate under the incumbent President Benjamin Harrison's ticket. He served as special ambassador of the United States for Queen Victoria's jubilee in 1897, and went on to become Ambassador to the United Kingdom from 1889 until his death in 1912.