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    Sale 2091

    Important American Silver

    17 January 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 78

    A FINE SILVER VASE

    DESIGN ATTRIBUTED TO CHARLES OSBORNE AND EDWARD C. MOORE, MARK OF TIFFANY & CO., NEW YORK, 1878-1891

    Price Realised  

    A FINE SILVER VASE
    DESIGN ATTRIBUTED TO CHARLES OSBORNE AND EDWARD C. MOORE, MARK OF TIFFANY & CO., NEW YORK, 1878-1891
    Gourd-form, on circular foot, with hammered surface, the lower body chased with whorls, the neck chased with swirling water and applied with a beetle and a dragonfly circling above, marked under base, also marked 5369/2369
    12 in. high; 30 oz.


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    This vase employs signature motifs of both Edward C. Moore and Charles Osborne and likely represents a collaboration between these two very talented designers. The organic shape of the vase and the applied dragonfly are firmly associated with Japanesesque style of Moore, while the chased spirals and hexagonal hammer marks are the designs of Charles Osborne.

    Osborne left his position as chief designer at Whiting for the opportunity to work with Edward C. Moore at Tiffany. His 1878 resignation letter to Whiting states: "I have long felt that I was making no real progress in my art work; and that I would be glad if I could find an opening, a place, where I could have a larger field for what talent I do possess... I became acquainted with Mr. Moore of Tiffany & Co. and recognized in him a man whom I believe has in him all the qualities I desire in a master. I broached the subject to him, and explained my wishes. He has been good enough to think favorable on the matter -- and the result is that I have found an engagement with him for a period of three years. I could have gone from you to other places -- but would not. I feel however that I cannot afford to let this opportunity for higher development pass by." Osborne's distinguished career at Tiffany & Co. lasted nine years and proved to be one of the most successful for the firm. For a discussion of Charles Osborne, see: John Loring, Magnificent Tiffany Silver, 2001, pp. 154-163.

    Literature

    John Loring, Magnificent Tiffany Silver, 2001, illus. p. 161.