• The Collection of Benjamin F.  auction at Christies

    Sale 2388

    The Collection of Benjamin F. Edwards III

    26 January 2010, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 110

    A GEORGE II SILVER CAKE BASKET

    MARK OF FREDERICK KNOPFELL, LONDON, 1753

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A GEORGE II SILVER CAKE BASKET
    MARK OF FREDERICK KNOPFELL, LONDON, 1753
    Shaped oval, with cast openwork border with moths and bees, the sides pierced and engraved with scrolls, on four scrolled feet with cast floral skirt, the center flat-chased with flowers and scrolls and centering an engraved coat-of-arms, the raised handle with figural terms, marked on base, with scratch weight 62=15
    15¼ in. (38.7 cm.) long; 61 oz. 10 dwt. (1,921 gr.)


    Contact Client Service
    • info@christies.com

    • New York +1 212 636 2000

    • London +44 (0)20 7839 9060

    • Hong Kong +852 2760 1766

    • Shanghai +86 21 6355 1766

    Contact the department

    The present lot was engraved for the marriage, on 8 October 1754, of Jane Noel, daughter of Baptist Noel, 4th Earl of Gainsborough, and Gerard Edwardes (c. 1734-1773) of Welham Grove, Leicester, illegitimate son of Mary Edwardes (d. 1743).

    Frederick Knopfell was working as a journeyman with Paul de Lamerie at the time of Lamerie's death in 1751 and was listed in Lamerie's will as one of two silversmiths to complete any unfinished commissions. Only one mark for Knopfell was entered (11 April 1752), associated with an address at Little Windmill Street, St. James's, a street on which Lamerie once held a workshop. To that end, it is possible that Knopfell oversaw some portion of Lamerie's work that continued to take place at Little Windmill Street. (See Arthur Grimwade, London Goldsmiths 1697-1837 Their Marks and Lives, 1976, p. 573.)

    The present basket was likely a product of Lamerie's former shop, as Lamerie is known to have used this model; an example of 1747 with the same moth and bee-clad openwork border, engraved with the arms of Henry Isaac (d. c. 1771), a London-based diamond merchant, sold Christie's, New York, 20 April 2000, lot 264.

    Provenance

    With Alastair Dickenson, London