• The Collection of Benjamin F.  auction at Christies

    Sale 2388

    The Collection of Benjamin F. Edwards III

    26 January 2010, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 151

    A GEORGE II SILVER KETTLE STAND OF SCOTTISH INTEREST

    MARK OF PEZE PILLEAU, LONDON, 1740

    Price Realised  

    A GEORGE II SILVER KETTLE STAND OF SCOTTISH INTEREST
    MARK OF PEZE PILLEAU, LONDON, 1740
    Triangular, on three paw feet, the border cast with flowers and rocaille, the field flat-chased with conforming decoration, centering an engraved lozenge-of-arms, marked on reverse
    9 7/8 in. (25.1 cm.) long; 22 oz. 10 dwt. (707 gr.)


    Contact Client Service
    • info@christies.com

    • New York +1 212 636 2000

    • London +44 (0)20 7839 9060

    • Hong Kong +852 2760 1766

    • Shanghai +86 21 6355 1766

    Contact the department

    The arms are those of Macdonald impaling Montgomerie, for Lady Margaret Macdonald (d. 1799). Famed for her loveliness, Lady Margaret was the daughter of Alexander, 9th Earl of Eglinton (d. 1729), and was married to Sir Alexander Macdonald (1711-1746), 7th baronet and 14th Chief of Sleat. She and her husband lived at Monkstadt house, the seat of the clan Donald on the Isle of Skye. Although Sir Alexander initially claimed to favor the Stuart restoration, he refused to join the Young Pretender after he landed in Scotland in 1745, and instead sided with the government. However, Lady Margaret remained sympathetic to the Jacobite cause, secretly sending clothes, newspapers, and money to the fugitive Bonnie Prince Charlie. The Prince sent Lady Margaret a letter expressing his gratitude, but, to her lasting regret, she was forced to burn it when her home was searched by government forces.

    Lady Margaret was greatly beloved; when James Boswell and Samuel Johnson visited Skye in 1773, they were told that "when she travelled through the island, the people ran in crowds before her, and took the stones off the road, lest her horse should stumble and she be hurt." (J. Boswell, The Journal of a Tour of the Hebrides, vol. II, 1898, p. 20.) Her name also lives on in a traditional Scottish bagpipe tune, "Lady Margaret Macdonald's Salute."

    Provenance

    With Partridge, London
    Highly Important Silver from the Collection of Lord Harris of Peckham, sold Christie's, London, 25 November 2008, lot 37
    With Alastair Dickenson, London