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    Sale 1993

    Important English Furniture

    25 April 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 107

    A GEORGE III GILTWOOD SETTEE

    POSSIBLY BY THOMAS CHIPPENDALE, CIRCA 1760 AND REDUCED IN LENGTH

    Price Realised  

    A GEORGE III GILTWOOD SETTEE
    POSSIBLY BY THOMAS CHIPPENDALE, CIRCA 1760 AND REDUCED IN LENGTH
    The shaped padded back, outscrolled arms and loose cushion seat covered in red floral silk damask, the crestrail with bold asymetrical foliate carving, the trellised and foliate-carved seatrail on foliate-scrolled legs, the seatrails with later inner supports, previously with casters, regilt
    95 in. (242 cm.) wide


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    This richly carved settee has its serpentined frame embellished with Roman acanthus foliage and water-scalloped cartouches in the French rocaille fashion. A drawing for a similarly conceived canapé was executed by the French designer Juste-Aurèle Meissonnier for the compte de Beilinski in 1735 (see P.Fuhring, Juste-Aurèle Meissonnier: Un génie du rococo 1695-1750, Turin, 1999, vol. II, p. 362, fig. 97). The settee corresponds to 'French easy chairs' adopted by Thomas Chippendale (d. 1779) for his St. Martin's Lane trade-label, and illustrated in his Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker's Director of 1754. His engraving of 1759, published in the 3rd edition of the Director, 1762 (pl. XLVI), featured similar 'picturesque' ornament on a couch that was executed for the London house in Whitehall of Henry Herbert, 10th Earl of Pembroke (d. 1794). The pattern of this settee corresponds to that of a pair of drawing-room armchairs and stools that remain in the collection of the Earl of Pembroke at Wilton House, Wiltshire, and it is therefore certainly possible that this settee together with its companion also sold at Sotheby's, 1 May 1987 (lot 53) formed part of the same commission. The Wilton chairs and stools are illustrated in Anthony Coleridge, Chippendale Furniture, London, 1968, figs. 187 and 199.

    In January 1760, Chippendale received £42 from Lord Pembroke for his 'various designs for fitting up rooms at Whitehall'; and amongst other Chippendale items now at Wilton House, Wiltshire, are brass lanterns, which are likewise of a pattern executed in 1759 and illustrated in the Director of 1762 (pl. CLII) (C. Gilbert, The Life and Work of Thomas Chippendale, London, 1972, vol. 11, p. 142, fig. 254).

    Provenance

    Possibly supplied to Henry Herbert, 10th Earl of Pembroke (d.1794) for his house at Whitehall.
    Anonymous sale; Sotheby's, London, 1 May 1987, lot 52.
    Anonymous sale; Christie's, London, 23 April 1998, lot 37.


    Pre-Lot Text

    Property from a Private Long Island Collection
    (LOT 107)