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    Sale 7561

    Simon Sainsbury The Creation of an English Arcadia

    18 June 2008, London, King Street

  • Lot 196

    A GEORGE III POLYCHROME AND GILT-JAPANNED PAPIER-MÂCHÉ POT-POURRI BOWL AND COVER

    LATE 18TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    A GEORGE III POLYCHROME AND GILT-JAPANNED PAPIER-MÂCHÉ POT-POURRI BOWL AND COVER
    LATE 18TH CENTURY
    Of chamfered rectangular outline with a domed top and tapering body, pierced with naturalistically painted sprays of summer flowers edged with gilt and with brass tray liner, repairs to the lid and finial
    11½ in. (29 cm.) high; 21 in. (54 cm.) wide; 15½ in. (39 cm.) deep


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    The use of papier-mâché as a commercial concern was promoted in the late 18th Century by Henry Clay. Clay was apprenticed in John Baskerville's japan shop in Birmingham, and established a papier-mâché factory in 1770, receiving a patent in November 1772 for his heat-resisting panels suitable for lacquering or japanning. Initially the panels were made for the bodies of coaches and sedan chairs but was soon in demand for all manner of goods including bottle stands, boxes, tea boards and salvers. He received Royal recognition becoming japanner to King George III and the Prince of Wales, moving his works to London's Covent Garden in 1802. The vogue for papier-mâché continued in the 19th Century, the most prolific maker being the celebrated firm of Jennens & Bettridge who exported to both India and America (Shirley Spaulding Devoe, English Papier Mâché of the Georgian and Victorian Periods, Connecticut, 1971).

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    With Alfred Bull.
    Acquired from Mallett, 14 November 1980.