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    Sale 2042

    Important English Furniture

    17 October 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 91

    A GEORGE III SATINWOOD, MAHOGANY AND MARQUETRY TRIPOD TABLE

    IN THE MANNER OF THOMAS CHIPPENDALE, CIRCA 1775

    Price Realised  

    A GEORGE III SATINWOOD, MAHOGANY AND MARQUETRY TRIPOD TABLE
    IN THE MANNER OF THOMAS CHIPPENDALE, CIRCA 1775
    Restorations to the top
    27¾ in. (70.5 cm.) high; 23 in. (58.5 cm.) diameter


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    In 1764, Thomas Chippendale (d.1779) supplied two tables of this form veneered in amber-colored 'Guadelupe' mahogany to Sir Lawrence Dundas, Bt., for his London mansion at 19 Arlington Street (see C. Gilbert, The Life and Work of Thomas Chippendale, London, 1978, vol. I, pp. 156 and 159). A further three related tables exist at Harewood House, Yorkshire corresponding to a Chippendale design of circa 1772 (C. Gilbert, op. cit., vol. II, pp. 254, 256, figs. 464, 469). The same base features on a pair of candlestands supplied by Chippendale in 1774 for Paxton House, Berwickshire (ibid., vol. II, p. 212, fig. 385) and the Gothic-cusped flutes and panelled leg appear on a firescreen supplied in the mid-1770s for Newby Hall, Yorkshire (fig. 334).

    Obviously a popular form of occasional table, others of this same model are known. A very similar mahogany example was sold anonymously, Christie's, London, 6 July 2000, lot 65. Others more elaborate with carved stems include: one sold, the property of a Lady, Christie's, London, 27 November 2003, lot 15; another sold Christie's, London, 11 November 1999, lot 30; and a most recent example from a New York Townhouse, Christie's, New York, 15 April 2005, lot 233.

    The table's inlaid sunflower framed by a golden hexagonal compartment, serves as a poetic trophy to recall the ceiling of Apollo's temple, known through its illustration in Richard Wood's Ruins of the Temple of the Sun at Palmyra, 1753. The scrolled 'claw' is inlaid with trompe l'oeil flutes in the antique manner which can also be found panelled in other examples.

    Pre-Lot Text

    Property from the Mildred H. Morse Revocable Trust