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    Sale 1896

    Important Silver And Objects Of Vertu

    26 October 2007, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 173

    A GEORGE III SILVER-GILT CUP AND COVER

    MARK OF ROBERT SHARP, LONDON, 1799

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A GEORGE III SILVER-GILT CUP AND COVER
    MARK OF ROBERT SHARP, LONDON, 1799
    Vase-shaped, on spreading circular foot with gadrooned border, partly-fluted body with harp-shaped handles, ribbed and gadrooned handles with finials and rosettes, the detachable cover partly-fluted with gadrooned rim and acorn finial, body engraved with coat-of-arms on one side and a commemorative plaque on the other side, marked on cover and foot
    16 in. (40.2 cm.) high; 79 oz. (2459 gr.)
    The engraved inscription: A token of friendship and gratitude from Governor Dalzel to Captain John Tobin, 1799

    The arms are those of Tobin, as borne by Sir Captain John Tobin (1763-1851).


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    Governor Archibald Dalzel (1740-1811) was the British Governor of the Gold Coast, now Ghana, Africa. Trained as a surgeon, he published The History of Dahomy, an Inland Kingdom of Africa; Compiled from Authentic Memoirs in 1793. A portrait of Governor Dalzel can be seen at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, England.

    Captain John Tobin (1763-1851) was a successful privateer and slave trader from the Isle of Man. He went to sea at an early age as an apprentice in a merchant vessel and on his first voyage was captured by a French privateer. In 1793, while Britain was still at war with France, Tobin became a master mariner and took over the privateer Gipsy and later Molly. He captured numerous French vessels, each of which carried valuable cargoes including slaves. He continued the lucrative business of privateering and slave trading until it was abolished in 1807.

    Upon his early retirement, he became active in Liverpool politics and became mayor in 1819. He was knighted by George IV at Carlton House in 1820.