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    Sale 7686

    Highly Important Silver from the Collection of Lord Harris of Peckham

    25 November 2008, London, King Street

  • Lot 19

    A GEORGE IV ROYAL SILVER-GILT EWER AND BASIN

    THE BASIN WITH THE MARK OF WILLIAM ELLIOTT, LONDON, 1820, THE EWER APPARENTLY UNMARKED, CIRCA 1820

    Price Realised  

    A GEORGE IV ROYAL SILVER-GILT EWER AND BASIN
    THE BASIN WITH THE MARK OF WILLIAM ELLIOTT, LONDON, 1820, THE EWER APPARENTLY UNMARKED, CIRCA 1820
    The basin shaped oblong, the ewer inverted helmet-shaped with gadrooned rim and on spreading foot, with leaf-capped scroll handle, each engraved with foliage scrolls and flowers and with egg and dart borders, engraved with the Royal arms with a label for difference and below a Royal princess' coronet, the basin marked on base
    the basin 15¼ in. (39 cm.) wide
    the ewer 10¼ in. (26 cm.) high
    70 oz. (2,175 gr.)
    The Royal arms are those of Princess Sophia (1777-1848), the sixth daughter of King George III and Queen Charlotte. (2)


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    Princess Sophia (1777-1848) was the fifth daughter of King George III (1760-1820) and Queen Charlotte (1744-1818). As with her sisters she was very much overshadowed by her strong willed mother. She was both delicate and of nervous nature. Like her sister Augusta (1768-1840) she never married. After Queen Charlotte's death 1818 Princess Sophia moved to Kensington Palace and became close to the Duchess of Kent, Queen Victoria's mother. Both she and the Duchess came under the influence of Sir John Conroy and after the Princess' death it became clear that he had misappropriated much of her money. In her later years she lived at Vicarage Place, Kensington. It was there that she died intestate on 27 May 1848. Following her death her executors had her jewellery and silver valued by Garrard, her finer furniture by a Mr. Owen and her household furniture and effects by Christie's. (R. Roberts ed., George III and Queen Charlotte, Patronage and Collecting and Court Taste, London, 2004, p. 388) A number of pieces with a royal provenance re-entered the Royal Collection and others were given to the four surviving siblings of the Princess. The remaining plate was sold by Garrard in November 1848. The household contents were sold by Christie's in December of that year and the library in the February following.

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    Provenance

    H.R.H. Princess Sophia, (1777-1848).
    Probably sold on her death in 1848 to Garrard.


    Pre-Lot Text

    HIGHLY IMPORTANT SILVER FROM THE COLLECTION OF LORD HARRIS OF PECKHAM