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    Sale 7746

    PARISIAN TASTE IN LONDON: A PRIVATE COLLECTION AND FURNITURE

    10 September 2009, London, King Street

  • Lot 44

    A GERMAN SILVER SERVING-DISH FROM THE 'D' SERVICE OF GEORGE LOUIS, DUKE OF BRUNSWICK AND LUNEBURG

    MARK OF ALEXANDER HEINRICH DIESTER, HANOVER, 1726

    Price Realised  

    A GERMAN SILVER SERVING-DISH FROM THE 'D' SERVICE OF GEORGE LOUIS, DUKE OF BRUNSWICK AND LUNEBURG
    MARK OF ALEXANDER HEINRICH DIESTER, HANOVER, 1726
    Circular and with reeded rim, engraved with a coat-of-arms below a crown and the initials 'GCL', marked underneath, further engraved 'S.1 No. 13' and stamped 'EE89'
    13½ in. (34 cm.) diam.
    39 oz. (1,207 gr.)
    The arms and initials GLC, for George Louis Churfürst, are those of George Louis, Duke of Brunswick and Luneburg, later King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover (1660-1727).


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    The Inventory of Silver of the Royal and Electoral Court, Hanover, 1747 offers a 'Complete inventory of the court silver comprising all his Royal Majesty our most gracious lords utensils of Gold and Silver, at present in the Royal and Elctoral Silver-Chamber at Hanover...' was compiled, originally in German and later translated to English, from various inventories from earlier in the 18th Century by the Grand Court commissary Friderich August Bartels. Besides descriptions of the various services and other items of plate from the Hanoverian court it lists weights for each item, or series of items, in both pounds and loth, though as the pound weight does not correspond to the loth weight it seems that 'mark' was probably mistranslated into pound.

    The 'D' service was enough to serve 72, at three tables of 24 and weighed a total of some 3,266 marks of silver. The original service was made early in the 18th Century and so was engraved with the arms as used by George Louis after 1698 when he succeeded his father as Duke of Brunswick and Luneberg but before 1708 when he was proclaimed Prince-Elector. The service was added to in the mid 1720s and was engraved with matching, though by then out of date, arms.

    Much of the Hanover Royal plate, including no doubt the present serving dish, remained at Herrenhausen until shortly after the Seven Weeks war in 1866. During the war the Palace was sacked by Prussian troops but the Royal Plate survived, having been locked away in a vault which in turn was hidden by lime and debris. George Frederick, King of Hanover, was deposed during that war and the family was deprived of the title of Kings and were, henceforth, styled Dukes of Brunswick. They settled in Austria and their silver was moved to Penzing near Vienna and the Duke's villa at Gmunden. Following the death of George Frederick's son, Ernest Augustus, in 1923 a considerable part of the Hanover silver, both German and English, was purchased by the Viennese dealer Gluckselig and it appears to have been, at least in part, resold to London dealers Crichton brothers. While presumably at least some of the 'D' service was included in that group at least some remained in the family of the Dukes of Brunswick, ending up at Schloss Marienburg before being sold in the sale of Works of Art From the Royal House of Hanover, Sotheby's House sale, 5-15 October 2005, for example lots 1141 and 1142.

    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    Apparently one of a set of '24 large serving-plates of the 5th sort' supplied to George Louis, Duke of Brunswick and Luneburg, King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover to match the earlier 'D' service
    By descent in the Royal family of Great Britain and Hanover until the death of King William IV in 1837, at which time the two kingdoms became separate under different monarchs.
    Ernest Augustus, 1st Duke of Cumberland and King of Hanover (r.1837-1851), fifth son of King George III of Great Britain and brother of King William IV.
    By descent to his grandson the Duke of Brunswick (1845-1923)
    Sold privately to the Vienna dealers Gluckselig in 1924.


    Literature

    Recorded in the 'Inventory of Silver of the Royal and Electoral Court, Hanover, 1747', p. 23, section 4 as one of '24 large serving plates of the 5th sort 127 pounds [sic] 15¾ loth.'