• Art of the Islamic and Indian  auction at Christies

    Sale 7751

    Art of the Islamic and Indian Worlds

    6 October 2009, London, King Street

  • Lot 190

    A GILT-COPPER MOUNTED IZNIK POTTERY JUG

    OTTOMAN TURKEY, CIRCA 1600, THE MOUNT POSSIBLY ENGLISH, PROBABLY CONTEMPORARY

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A GILT-COPPER MOUNTED IZNIK POTTERY JUG
    OTTOMAN TURKEY, CIRCA 1600, THE MOUNT POSSIBLY ENGLISH, PROBABLY CONTEMPORARY
    Of baluster form on short foot rising to a flaring trumpet mouth, with simple loop handle, decorated in cobalt-blue, green and black, the body with alternating swaying bands on white and green grounds, the neck with bands of blue lobes and black dots, with small black swaying lines above the foot, two similar gilt-copper mounts with triangular indentations around the mouth and the foot, the top mount fixed to the handle with a small ring issuing a lobed palmette, the lid hinged to the mouth with a shell-shaped thumb-piece and a croutching chimera, the spout lightly indicated, intact, small chips, rubbed
    8¼in. (20.8cm.) high


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    Numerous jugs from this design of Iznik pottery with late 16th century European mounts are now in Western European collections and particularly in England. A jug with English silver-gilt mounts hallmarked 1586-87 AD on loan to the Ashmolean Museum with a similar stripe design gives a close comparable to our jug and indicates that the mounts were added soon after the pottery was made. Although there is no direct comparable for the chimera of the lid, an Iznik jug with parcel-gilt mounts in the Victoria and Albert Museum has a similar shell-shaped thumb piece and is dated circa 1580-85 (Europa und der Orient, exhibition catalogue, Berlin, 1989, pp.615-16). In their discussion of European mounts on Iznik pottery, Nurhan Atasoy and Julian Raby link the affluence of Iznik pottery to England in the 1580s and after with the negotiation of the first English capitulations treatise with the Ottoman Empire in 1580 (Nurhan Atasoy and Julian Raby, znik, pp. 269-72, London1989). For another jug of similar design see lot 177.

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    Provenance

    Sotheby's, 25 April 1990, lot 433