• Japanese and Korean Art  auction at Christies

    Sale 2193

    Japanese and Korean Art

    17 September 2009, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 1044

    A Kinrinji-style Lacquered-Wood Caddy for Thin Tea and an Octagonal Lacquered-Wood Caddy for Thin Tea (Natsume) Named "Nokaze" (Wind in the fields)

    EDO PERIOD (18TH CENTURY), THE FIRST ATTRIBUTED TO NAKAMURA SOTETSU IV (HACHIROBEI; 1726-1791)

    Price Realised  

    A Kinrinji-style Lacquered-Wood Caddy for Thin Tea and an Octagonal Lacquered-Wood Caddy for Thin Tea (Natsume) Named "Nokaze" (Wind in the fields)
    Edo period (18th century), the first attributed to Nakamura Sotetsu IV (Hachirobei; 1726-1791)
    The first cylindrical with round, flat lid lacquered in brown and black in a pattern of simulated wood (mokume), the interior black lacquer; the second designed in gold low-relief lacquer (hiramaki-e) with grasses on a glossy black-lacquer ground (roiro-nuri) and inscribed on the flat lid in raised silver lacquer with the characters for "Nokaze," the name of the tea caddy
    First 2¾in. (7cm.) high, 2 7/8in. (7.4cm.) diameter; second 2 7/8in. (7.5cm.) high, 2 3/16in. (5.6cm.) diameter (2)


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    The Kinrinji tea container is named for a caddy of raw mountain ivy with richly mottled grain Emperor Go-Daigo (r. 1318-39) is said to have ordered to take to tea with a monk. The vessels are typically cylindrical with shallow, slightly overhanging lids reminiscent of sutra containers or the overhanging eaves of temples. For the fourteenth-century caddy in the collection of Daiun-in Temple, Kyoto, see Ryoichi Fujioka et al., Tea Ceremony Utensils, translated and adapted by Louise Allison Cort, vol. 3 of Arts of Japan (Tokyo and New York: Weatherhill/Shibundo, 1973), pl. 53.