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    Sale 2159

    19th Century Furniture, Sculpture, Works of Art and Ceramics

    21 April 2009, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 58

    A LARGE MEISSEN MODEL OF COUNT BRÜHL'S TAILOR

    LATE 19TH CENTURY, BLUE CROSSED SWORDS MARK, INCISED NO. 101, IMPRESSED 60, AFTER THE MODEL BY J.J. KÄNDLER

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A LARGE MEISSEN MODEL OF COUNT BRÜHL'S TAILOR
    LATE 19TH CENTURY, BLUE CROSSED SWORDS MARK, INCISED NO. 101, IMPRESSED 60, AFTER THE MODEL BY J.J. KÄNDLER
    Modeled seated astride a billy-goat, the bewigged and bespectacled gentleman wearing a floral coat, boots and a tricorn hat, the tools of his trade all about him, including an iron and scissors hanging from the animal's horns and a pin-cushion on his rump
    17 in. (43.2 cm.) high


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    Count Heinrich Brühl was minister and favorite to Augustus III. He was appointed administrator of the Meissen factory from 1733 to 1763. By tradition Brühl was a man famed for his fashion sense. His tailor was thus an important part of his entourage. However, when the tailor's ambitions made him ask for an invitation to dine at court, the Count found the suggestion beyond the pale and well above the tailor's station. To put him in his place, the Count requested Kändler to make a figure of the tailor which he could place on his table and thus fulfill his empty promises. Kändler's undoubted satiric wit and sense of the ridiculous is here preserved. See Len and Yvonne Adams, Meissen Portrait Figures, London, 1987, p. 188 and 192; also see Robert Röntgen, The Book of Meissen, Atglen, PA, 1996, p. 44-45 and the back dust jacket cover, for two full page illustrations of this model. Also according to Berling ed., Meissen an Illustration History, p. 35, this group is described in the Meissen records of 1744 as the 'Brühl tailor', however no reference to a particular person or event is mentioned.