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    Sale 2825

    The Decorative Arts Sale

    30 June - 1 July 2009, Amsterdam

  • Lot 186

    A PAIR OF ENGLISH 20-INCH LIBRARY GLOBES

    NEWTON & SON, THE TERRESTRIAL DATED 1841, THE CELESTIAL DATED 1830

    Price Realised  

    A PAIR OF ENGLISH 20-INCH LIBRARY GLOBES
    NEWTON & SON, THE TERRESTRIAL DATED 1841, THE CELESTIAL DATED 1830
    NEWTON'S new and Improved TERRESTRIAL GLOBE Accurately delineated from the observations of the most esteemed NAVIGATORS and TRAVELLERS To the present time Manufactured by NEWTON & SON 66 Chancery Lane, LONDON Published 1st January 1841 and 'NEWTON'S CELESTIAL GLOBE on which all the Stars, Nebulae and Clusters contained in the extensive Catalogue of the late F.WOLLASTON.FRS. are accurately laid down their Right Ascensions & Declinations, having been recalculated for the Year 1830 by W. Newton Manufactured by NEWTON & SON, 66 Chancery Lane, LONDON, each with engraved meridian ring, paper horizon ring, on mahogany tripod with cabriole legs, joined by three stretchers centred by a compass
    109 cm. high overall (2)


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    During the first half of the 19th Century, the firm of Newton, together with Bardin and Cary, occupied a leading position in the manufacture of globes in London. The firm was established by John Newton (1759-1844) in 1783 and operated originally from the Globe & Sun 128 Chancery Lane, moving to 97 Chancery Lane in 1803, before settling at 66 Chancery Lane in 1817. In 1818 he was joined by his son William (1786-1861) and from 1818 the firm published globes under the names of Newton & Son and J. & W. Newton, the addition being William (1786-1861), son of John. William was a valuable addition to the firm, operating also as a patent agent, and in 1832 his familiar introduction to astronomy and the use of globes was published to accompany the globes they produced. The company's name changed again in the 1830's, to Newton, Son & Berry (1832-1841) as they were joined by Miles Berry (another patent agent and civil engineer). William's son, William Edward (1818-1879), joined in 1838 and the firm became known as W. Newton & Son, or once again simply Newton & Son from 1841 until about 1883. Perhaps the greatest triumph for the Newton family was the Great Exhibition of 1851, where aside from the globes they exhibited from 1 to 25 inch diameter, they were awarded a prize medal for a manuscript terrestrial globe of six feet diameter.
    See also: E. Dekker and P. van der Krogt, Globes from the Western World, London, 1993, p. 118, 119, 177.

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    Saleroom Notice

    Please note this lot will be offered without reserve. This lot will be sold to the highest bidder regardless of the pre-sale estimate printed in the catalogue.