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    Sale 7464

    Un hôtel particulier du Faubourg Saint-Germain The Collection of The Marquis and Marquise de Ravenel

    21 - 22 November 2007, London, King Street

  • Lot 19

    A PAIR OF GEORGE III IRISH SILVER MEAT-DISHES FROM THE EARL OF DROGHEDA SERVICE

    MARK OF ROBERT CALDERWOOD, DUBLIN, CIRCA 1770

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A PAIR OF GEORGE III IRISH SILVER MEAT-DISHES FROM THE EARL OF DROGHEDA SERVICE
    MARK OF ROBERT CALDERWOOD, DUBLIN, CIRCA 1770
    Shaped oval and with gadrooned rim, engraved with a coat-of-arms below an earl's coronet, each marked on the back, the backs further engraved with a number and scratchweight 'No. 5 51"18' and 'No. 6 54"17'
    16¾ in. (42.7 cm.) long
    105 oz. (3,261 gr.)
    The arms are those of Moore, for Edward, 6th Earl of Drogheda and later 1st Marquess of Drogheda (1730-1822). (2)


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    Special Notice

    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.


    Provenance

    Purchased from Louis Wine, Dublin.


    Pre-Lot Text

    THE EARL OF DROGHEDA SERVICE

    Styled Viscount Moore from 1752 to 1758, Edward Moore entered the army in 1744 when he carried the colours at the battle of Culloden, being promoted to brevet lieutenant-colonel in 1755. He served as M.P. for St. Canice in the Irish parliament in 1756-8, and was Grand Master of Freemasons in Ireland from 1758 to 1760. Following his father's death in 1758 he succeeded as 6th Earl of Drogheda, taking his seat in the Irish House of Lords on 16 October 1759.

    His military and political career continued when he was made governor of co. Meath and appointed Lieutenant-Colonel Commandant of the 19th, afterwards the 18th Light Dragoons, of which he was Colonel from 3 August 1762 until its disbandment in September 1821.

    In 1760 he became a member of the Irish Privy Council and succeeded William Gerard Hamilton as Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant on the appointment of Hugh Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland, as Viceroy in 1763, and in April 1766, during the absence of Francis Seymour-Conway, 1st Marquess of Hertford, he was appointed a Lord Justice. He married on 15 February 1766 Anne Seymour-Conway (b.1744), daughter of the Marquess of Hertford, and with her, had ten children; she died on 43 November 1784.

    Moore's ambition of becoming an Irish Marquess was realised on 5 July 1791 when he was created 1st Marquess of Drogheda and, in reward for his support in parliament for the union in January 1801 he was created Baron Moore of Moore Place in Kent in the peerage of the United Kingdom. This was reluctantly conceded to him by the Duke of Portland, and only to facilitate Marquess Cornwallis's arrangements for the representative peers. 'He is,' wrote Cornwallis to Major Ross on 3 July 1800, 'perfectly insignificant in respect to weight and interest in the country, and I only recommended him as being the oldest marquis in order to assist me in providing room for friends in the representative peerage' (Correspondence of Cornwallis, 3.269). Moore died in Sackville Street, Dublin on in December 1822, and was buried with great pomp on 3 January 1823 in St Peter's Church, Drogheda, where he had been the oldest freeman of the city.