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    Sale 12555

    The Imperial Sale / Important Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art

    1 June 2016, Convention Hall

  • Lot 3251

    A PAIR OF HUANGHUALI SOUTHERN OFFICIAL’S ARMCHAIRS, NANGUANMAOYI

    QING DYNASTY, 17TH/18TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A PAIR OF HUANGHUALI SOUTHERN OFFICIAL’S ARMCHAIRS, NANGUANMAOYI
    QING DYNASTY, 17TH/18TH CENTURY
    Each with a bowed crestrail above a curved back splat carved with sinuous dragons in a beaded-edge medallion, the S-shaped arms with vertical supports and metal mounts continued to S-shaped front support, extended to a hard cane seat mortised and tenoned to lingzhi shaped struts above a humpbacked stretcher, supported by legs of circular section with further humpbacked footstretchers just below the footrest.
    37 5/8 in. (95.7 cm) high; 21 7/8 in. (55.5 cm.) wide; 17 5/8 in. (44.7 cm.) deep


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    Armchairs such as the present type with enclosed crestrails are named nan guanmaoyi, or southern official’s armchair. The characteristic style of construction is depicting the image of an official’s hat, putou, as illustrated in Sancai Tuhui, which was published during Ming dynasty to demonstrate the power of privileged social rankings. Compare a few examples of the Southern Official’s Armchairs in the Beijing Palace Museum, illustrated in Furniture of the Ming and Qing Dynasties (I), The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum, Hong Kong, 2002, P. 44-45, No. 30, 31. Also refer to Connoisseurship of Chinese Furniture, Ming and Early Qing Dynasties by Wang Shixiang, Hong Kong, 1990, for further discussions on the differing forms of chairs.

    Provenance

    Alan Fung, Hong Kong, acquired in the 1980s


    Pre-Lot Text

    THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN