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    Sale 7621

    A Private English Collection of White Jade Carvings & Fine Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art Including Export Art

    4 November 2008, London, King Street

  • Lot 184

    A RARE BLUE AND WHITE 'RED CLIFF' BRUSHPOT, BITONG

    WITH AN INSCRIPITION DATED TO BINGZI YEAR, CORRESPONDING TO 1696, AND OF THE PERIOD

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A RARE BLUE AND WHITE 'RED CLIFF' BRUSHPOT, BITONG
    WITH AN INSCRIPITION DATED TO BINGZI YEAR, CORRESPONDING TO 1696, AND OF THE PERIOD
    Of slightly waisted cylindrical form, painted in bright shades of blue with a river scene, three figures play chess on a boat with two attendants, the otherside with a calligraphic inscription
    6 3/8 in. (16.2 cm.) high


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    The inscription is the Later Ode to the Red Cliff, composed by Su Shi (1036-1101) in the Northern Song Dynasty.

    Special Notice

    VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 15% on the buyer's premium


    Provenance

    John Laycock Collection, Singapore


    Pre-Lot Text

    THE JOHN LAYCOCK COLLECTION (lots 184 - 192)

    The late John Laycock (1887-1960) was born in England, and was admitted as a solicitor in London in 1907. He had a distinguished military career, rising to the position of Major, and was awarded the Military Cross (1914-1918).

    In 1920, John Laycock arrived in Singapore to join a legal firm (Braddell Brothers) and subsequently started his own law firm, Laycock and Ong. He married Alice, a Chinese Singaporean, and they subsequently adopted five local children.

    He was actively involved in Singapore politics, and was elected to Singapore's Legislative Council. He was instrumental in founding the Singapore Progressive Party which played a large part in Singapore obtaining self government, and was a tireless advocate for the disadvantaged.

    He was also a great horticulturalist, and collected orchid specimens from the jungles of Malaya and beyond. This collection, and his subsequent hybridization of orchids, laid the foundation for the emergence and growth of the orchid export industry in Singapore - a business which his daughter Amy (Ede), and her husband, subsequently developed.

    The pieces in his collection of Chinese art were mainly purchased from dealers on his business trips to Hong Kong between 1925 and 1955, in particular from T. Y. King & Sons. When the Japanese invaded Singapore in 1942 the family buried the collection in the garden before escaping to India and fortunately some pieces escaped the war unscathed.