• The Collection of Benjamin F.  auction at Christies

    Sale 2388

    The Collection of Benjamin F. Edwards III

    26 January 2010, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 83

    A REGENCY SILVER-GILT INKSTAND

    MARK OF JOHN HOULE, LONDON, 1817

    Price Realised  

    A REGENCY SILVER-GILT INKSTAND
    MARK OF JOHN HOULE, LONDON, 1817
    The rounded rectangular frame set on four winged paw feet, with scroll and rosette borders, the stand with two hinged pen troughs and set with three covered pots, the central pot with taperstick cover, the frame engraved with armorials, the pots, tapersticks and snuffer engraved with a crest, marked on base of stand and pots, cover bezels, taperstick, nozzle and snuffer, one nut marked
    12½ in. (31.7 cm.) long; 97 oz. 10 dwt. (3,043 gr.)


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    The arms are those of Vane for William Harry (1766-1842), 3rd Earl of Darlington and 1st Duke of Cleveland. He served as M.P. for Totnes and then Winchelsea before succeeding to the Earldom in 1792. He strongly supported the Reform Act of 1832, even though it would require him to relinquish the six pocket boroughs under his control. The next year, however, he was created Duke of Cleveland (of the second creation; the title had originally been held by his great-great-grandmother Barbara Villiers, a mistress of Charles II). It was thus said that he had purchased seats in Parliament to ensure his marquessate (in 1827), and then given them up to gain a dukedom.

    However, the Duke was perhaps more notable as a sportsman than a politician; at his seat of Raby Castle in Durham, he maintained two packs of hounds with which he hunted on alternate days. He is further reported to have had wine glasses made without feet so that his guests would be forced to drain their glasses without setting them down.

    Provenance

    With Alastair Dickenson, London