• Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works  auction at Christies

    Sale 2196

    Fine Chinese Ceramics & Works of Art Including Property from the Arthur M. Sackler Collections

    15 September 2009, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 190

    A VERY RARE GUYUE XUAN ENAMELED CARVED WHITE GLASS SNUFF BOTTLE

    IMPERIAL, PALACE WORKSHOPS, BEIJING, 1770-1799

    Price Realised  

    A VERY RARE GUYUE XUAN ENAMELED CARVED WHITE GLASS SNUFF BOTTLE
    IMPERIAL, PALACE WORKSHOPS, BEIJING, 1770-1799
    Of compressed ovoid form, carved in relief and painted in famille rose enamels with a continuous design of an eagle standing on one leg atop a rock beside grasses beneath a pine tree, the sun framed by colorful clouds, jadeite stopper with vinyl collar
    2 3/8 in. (6 cm.) high


    Contact Client Service
    • info@christies.com

    • New York +1 212 636 2000

    • London +44 (0)20 7839 9060

    • Hong Kong +852 2760 1766

    • Shanghai +86 21 6355 1766

    Contact the department

    In 1767, the Jian Yuan was completed in the Changchun Yuan complex (a series of Imperial gardens to the West of Beijing adjoining the Yuanming Yuan, known collectively as the Summer Palace). One of the halls within the Jian Yuan was the Guyue Xuan (Ancient Moon Pavilion). The Changchun Yuan was intended as a retirement home for the Qianlong Emperor, although he never took up full-time residence there. The Guyue Xuan was completed in 1767, prompting the Emperor to order a group of wares, mostly enamels on glass, bearing the name of that particular pavilion.
    The motif of an eagle standing on one leg, with sun and pine tree, imparts several symbolic meanings. An eagle (ying) perched on one leg (duli) is a rebus for the phrase yingxiong duli ('A great man towers over his peers'). The imagery evokes ideals of courage, loyalty and the ability to achieve great things. The combination of an eagle and a pine tree conveys a wish that such a great man will live a long life. See a very similar example illustrated by M. Hughes, The Blair Bequest. Chinese Snuff Bottles from the Princeton University Art Museum, p. 121, no. 138.

    Special Notice

    Items which contain rubies or jadeite originating in Burma (Myanmar) may not be imported into the U.S. As a convenience to our bidders, we have marked these lots with Y. Please be advised that a purchaser¹s inability to import any such item into the U.S. or any other country shall not constitute grounds for non-payment or cancellation of the sale. With respect to items that contain any other types of gemstones originating in Burma (e.g., sapphires), such items may be imported into the U.S., provided that the gemstones have been mounted or incorporated into jewellery outside of Burma and provided that the setting is not of a temporary nature (e.g., a string).


    Provenance

    G. T. Marsh & Co., Monterey, California, circa 1977.
    The Neal W. and Frances R. Hunter Collection.
    Sotheby's, New York, 15 September 1998, lot 15.
    Hugh Moss (HK) Ltd.


    Pre-Lot Text

    PROPERTY FROM THE J & J COLLECTION


    Literature

    C. Chu, "The J & J Collection of Chinese Snuff Bottles", Oriental Art, vol. XLIX, no. 2 (2003), p. 65.


    Exhibited

    Christie's, Los Angeles, 2003.