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    Sale 7574

    Thomas Hope & The Neoclassical Vision & The Collector of Collections

    24 April 2008, London, King Street

  • Lot 359

    A WILLIAM IV SILVER-GILT CUP AND COVER ON A CONFORMING INDIAN COLONIAL SILVER-GILT BASE

    MARK OF EDWARD, EDWARD, JOHN AND WILLIAM BARNARD, LONDON, 1831, THE BASE STAMPED 'HAMILTON AND CO'

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    A WILLIAM IV SILVER-GILT CUP AND COVER ON A CONFORMING INDIAN COLONIAL SILVER-GILT BASE
    MARK OF EDWARD, EDWARD, JOHN AND WILLIAM BARNARD, LONDON, 1831, THE BASE STAMPED 'HAMILTON AND CO'
    The cooler vase shaped and applied with fruiting grapevines and with rocaille rim, on square base, the detachable cover cast with rocaille and with a leaf and flower finial, the stand applied on two sides with laurel wreaths, the other sides applied with either a horse and rider or a pair of hounds, the body marked near handle, inside cover and on finial, the base stamped 'HAMILTON & CO.'
    20 in. (51 cm.) high
    weight of silver 188 oz. (5,861 gr.) (2)


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    In her article on the Emes and Barnard Ledgers in The Proceedings of the Society of Silver Collectors, Vol.II, p.169, J. Banister notes that this form of cup and cover, known as a 'wavy shells' cup, was 'of a pattern particularly popular in India'. The Calcutta firm of Hamilton and Co., whose mark appear on the base, were important clients of Barnard's and the name of their agent in London, Thorpe, appears in many of the accounts. Hamilton and Co. was founded in 1811 by Robert Hamilton (circa 1772-1847), although his interest in the firm came to an end in 1817, having returned to England in 1812.

    The firm continued with new partners, retaining the name and was one of the most successful of the Indian colonial silvermiths, producing a wide range of pieces of fine quality. As Judith Banister has points out, op cit, they supplemented the locally produced pieces with London-made work which they imported and often stamped with their own marks. The present cup, cover and stand is almost certainly from this group.

    For a pair of cups, covers and stands of very similar form, also by a combination of Barnard's and Hamilton and Co., see Christie's London, 31 March 1998, lot 46.

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