• Travel, Science & Natural Hist auction at Christies

    Sale 9540

    Travel, Science & Natural History

    10 October 2013, London, South Kensington

  • Lot 77

    AN EARLY ENGLISH TERRESTRIAL GLOBE

    MORDEN AND BERRY, CIRCA 1673

    Price Realised  

    AN EARLY ENGLISH TERRESTRIAL GLOBE
    MORDEN AND BERRY, CIRCA 1673
    the globe comprised of twelve hand-coloured engraved gores and two polar calottes, the cartouche A New TERRESTRIAL GLOBE. Made and sold by Robert Morden. and William Berry. at the Atlas neer the Royal Exchange in Cornhill and at the Globe between York House and the New Exchange in the Strand London with a second dedication to the Reader cartouche, graduated equator, ecliptic and meridian through the Azores, the continents decorated with animals and natives, the seas with ships, sea monsters and rhumb lines; no Antarctic continent, Australia partially delineated to West and North, some of van Diemen's land given, California as an Island, no Western nor Northern coasts to Canada, Southern Greenland as a series of Islands, China with rivers and major cities to the East of the Great Wall, peninsula of Corea; supported in graduated brass meridian ring, fitting in horizon ring with engraved calendrical scales, on walnut and oak stand of six legs, three with turned twists, united with cross stretchers under central plate, six bun feet
    21in. (53cm.) high


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    ONE OF THE EARLIEST AND RAREST ENGLISH GLOBES
    An advertisment from 1673 for "new sizes of globes, about 15 inches in diameter, celestial and terrestrial, 4 pounds the pair" issuing from the map shop of Morden and Berry provides us with the approximate date for this globe. Predated only by the globes of Molyneux and Moxon in England, this is the earliest recorded globe by Morden and Berry (a set of gores at the British Museum, circa 1683 are by Morden, Berry and Lea). The only other example recorded by Dunn & Wallis, on a modern stand, was in the Didcock collection (The World in Your Hands, 4.52).

    Literature

    Dunn, R. & Wallis, H. British globes up to 1850 (London, 1999).
    Stephenson, E.L. Terrestrial and Celestial Globes (Yale, 1921).
    The World in Your Hands: an Exhibition of Globes and Planetaria (London, 1994).