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    Sale 2611

    Important Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art

    27 May 2008, Hong Kong

  • Lot 1858

    AN EXTREMELY RARE AND IMPORTANT MING IRON-RED AND GILT-DECORATED RETICULATED KINRANDE EWER AND COVER

    Price Realised  

    AN EXTREMELY RARE AND IMPORTANT MING IRON-RED AND GILT-DECORATED RETICULATED KINRANDE EWER AND COVER
    JIAJING PERIOD (1522-1566)

    Of flattened pear shape rising to a tall cylindrical neck, terminating with a broad cupped mouth, each of the two sides with a raised pierced peach-shaped panel, delicately carved and incised with peony sprays issuing from intricate rockwork, the ewer is finely enamelled in a rich iron-red tone and painted in gilt, with lotus scrolls applied in gilt below bands of stiff leaves and floral sprays around the neck and the splayed foot, the gracefully arched strap-handle and the elegantly curved spout with flower and flame patterns, attached to the body with a scroll-shaped strut, the flattened domed cover surmounted by a Buddhistic lion finial
    11 5/8 in. (29.5 cm) high, Japanese wood box


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    Enamelled wares embellished with gilt to resemble the appearance of rich brocade are known by the Japanese term, kinrande. Their combination of brilliant colours was derived from a highly attuned visual enjoyment of painting, lacquer and silk. In the 16th century, items of this type were exported to Japan where they were highly valued, as the Japanese kilns did not start making porcelain until the early 17th century, and even their products were limited in numbers and localised in distribution. A newly arisen class of wealthy merchants prospered in many emergent urban centres, and it was this group that fostered the growth of the tea ceremony as it is practised today.

    A comparable example without the openwork panels but with a Jiajing six-character reign mark was sold at Christie's Hong Kong, 27 October 2003, lot 606.

    Provenance

    Formerly in a private Japanese collection, Kanawaza prefecture, prior to World War II
    A Japanese private collection, Kushu prefecture, acquired from the above in the 1970's