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    Sale 1896

    Important Silver And Objects Of Vertu

    26 October 2007, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 274

    AN IMPORTANT GEORGE II SILVER COFFEE POT**

    MARK OF CHARLES KANDLER, LONDON, CIRCA 1730

    Price Realised  

    AN IMPORTANT GEORGE II SILVER COFFEE POT**
    MARK OF CHARLES KANDLER, LONDON, CIRCA 1730
    Baluster form, the body, cover, and foot divided into six panels of finely chased overlapping scallop shells, between pronounced fluted ribs, the spout and handle sockets with conforming decoration, with carved ivory handle, marked under base with maker's mark struck four times
    10½ in. (26.6 cm.) high; 36 oz. (1128 gr.) gross weight


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    German-born Charles Kandler brought a Dresden-influenced style to London when he emigrated to England, some time before 1727 when his mark was first registered at Goldsmiths' Hall. While German characteristics have long been recognized in Kandler's silver, only recently have scholars discovered that Kandler was in fact the older brother of the famous porcelain modeller, Johann Joachim Kandler of the Saxon Royal factory at Meissen. (Rainer Ruckert, Peter Cameron and Philippa Glanville have published new information. See Peter Cameron,"Henry Jernegan, the Kandlers and the Client Who Changed his Mind," Silver Society Journal, Autumn 1996, p. 495, fig. 7, and Philippa Glanville, Silver Torah Scrolls by Kandler: Rococo Elegance in Miniature, National Art Collections Fund Annual Review, 1993, p. 28). Charles Kandler, born Carl Rudolph, had been apprenticed under the Dresden court silversmith, Johann Jacob Irminger, who was also artistic director of the Meissen factory and who supplied many designs for porcelain. The influence of the porcelain designs in Charles Kandler's London silverwork is indisputable; his silver soup tureens, for example, have exact counterparts in Meissen. The present coffee pot, although stylistically much more inventive than the tureens, does betray German characteristics in its pronounced baluster shape, scalloped fluting, robust modelling, and in its arrangement of the decoration into vertical panels. However, the beautifully executed bands of chased overlapping shells, extending even to the spout and handle sockets, appear to be a unique and particularly successful design.

    Special Notice

    Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.


    Provenance

    Christie's, New York, 20 April 2001, lot 328


    Pre-Lot Text

    ANOTHER PROPERTY