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    Sale 7571

    Art of the Islamic and Indian Worlds

    8 April 2008, London, King Street

  • Lot 51

    AN OPAQUE TURQUOISE GLASS JUG

    SYRIA OR IRAN, 11-12TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    AN OPAQUE TURQUOISE GLASS JUG
    SYRIA OR IRAN, 11-12TH CENTURY
    The rounded body rising from short foot to slightly everted cylindrical neck, simple handle with small knop finial, undecorated, repaired breaks
    4¾in. (12.1cm.) high


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    It is rare to find a vessel that uses opaque turquoise glass as the body material. The most famous example is the wheel-cut bowl in the Treasury of Saint Mark, Venice, which on the grounds of the style of carving is attributed to Khorassan (Giovanni Curatola, Eredità dell'Islam, exhibition catalogue, Venice, 1993, no.26, pp.98-9; also Stefano Carboni, Glass of the Sultans, exhibition catalogue, New York, 2002, no.82, pp.176-7). This is despite the fact that apparently no turquoise glass was actually found in the excavations at Nishapur (Jens Kroeger, Nishapur Glass of the Early Islamic Period, New York, 1995). Another example is a wheel-cut bottle in the Corning Museum (Carboni, op.cit, no.75, pp.169-70). The note to that entry lists a small number of further examples. The colour was also known in Syria, as well as being the base for a very few Mamluk enamelled vessels such as a fragment in the al-Sabah collection. A pale green glass jug of very similar form was excavated at Samarkand Terres secrètes de Samarkande, exhibition catalogue, Paris, 1992, no.320, p.118).

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