• Art of the Islamic and Indian  auction at Christies

    Sale 7843

    Art of the Islamic and Indian Worlds

    13 April 2010, London, King Street

  • Lot 235

    AN OTTOMAN GILT-COPPER (TOMBAK) INCENSE BURNER

    TURKEY, SECOND HALF 17TH/EARLY 18TH CENTURY

    Price Realised  

    AN OTTOMAN GILT-COPPER (TOMBAK) INCENSE BURNER
    TURKEY, SECOND HALF 17TH/EARLY 18TH CENTURY
    Of waisted ovoid form, the bowl rising from domed knop on circular tray with slightly raised rim, with separate hinged cover with two supporting chains linking it to the body and finial in the form of a flowerhead issuing arched leaves, the cover and domed knop pierced and engraved with a fine design of floral and palmette lattice, the bowl with a similar but chased design, the tray with a series of chased medallions surrounded by an elegant cut design of palmettes and scrolling vine issuing split leaves, with seperate bowl inside, small loss to tray
    8 1/8in. (20.6cm.) high


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    The technique and style of the elegant deeply cut design on the lid and foot of this incense burner recall the work on two pieces in the Topkapi Palace Museum. One is the lid of an incense burner, the bowl of which is late Ming Chinese porcelain, the lid of which was fashioned from silver in Ottoman Turkey in the second half of the 17th century. The other is a similarly dated silver gilt clock (The Anatolian Civilisations, exhibition catalogue, vol. III, nos. E.271 and E.270, pp.265-266). That example is said to have been made by European craftsmen inspired by Ottoman motifs. It is a style however that continued in Turkey until the mid 18th century and came to be predominant in fine metalwork of other forms (Topkapi à Versailles, Trésors de la Cour ottomane, exhibition catalogue, Paris, 1999, no. 228, p. 261). The European taste of the palmettes and the swags issuing from them on the present incense burner may be a reflection of the source from which the style developed.