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    Sale 2011

    Fine Printed Books and Manuscripts Including Americana

    12 June 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 128

    ARETAEUS of Cappadocia (fl. ca A.D. 50). Libri septem - RUFUS of Ephesus (fl. 1st century A.D.) De corporis humani partium appellationbus libri tres. Both texts translated from Greek into Latin by Junius Paulus Crassus (ca 1500-75). Venice: Giunta, 1552.

    Price Realised  

    ARETAEUS of Cappadocia (fl. ca A.D. 50). Libri septem - RUFUS of Ephesus (fl. 1st century A.D.) De corporis humani partium appellationbus libri tres. Both texts translated from Greek into Latin by Junius Paulus Crassus (ca 1500-75). Venice: Giunta, 1552.

    4o (235 x 157 mm). Printer's woodcut device on title page and verso of last leaf, woodcut ornamental initials (last blank leaf missing, occasional some foxing and dampstaining, tiny hole in blank margin of title, very minor marginal worming at end). Modern vellum. Provenance: Joannis Adam (early ownership inscription on title).

    FIRST EDITIONS, Aretaeus Libri septem preceding the publication of the Greek text by two years. This Latin translation had great influence. Aretaeus left so many classic descriptions of diseases that Garrison-Morton cites his work 14 times. "As a clinician, Aretaeus ranks next to the Father of Medicine in the graphic accuracy and fidelity of his pictures of disease, of which he has given the classic accounts of pneumonia, pleurisy with empyema, diabetes, tetanus, elephantiasis, diphtheria, the aura in epilepsy, the first clear differentiation between cerebral and spinal paralysis, indicating the decussation of the pyramids, and a very full account of the different kinds of insanity." (Garrison-Morton).

    Rufus's treatise On the naming of the parts of the human body was the first work to deal with anatomical nomenclature. Rufus, who practiced medicine at Ephesus and wrote in Greek, was the most important Greek physician after Galen, and was ranked by the Byzantines with Hippocrates, Galen and Cheiron (a centaur, the mythical teacher of physicians). Rufus is credited with some 96 works on a wide range of medical subjects. A number of these survive, while fragments of others are known from Oribasius and other medical compilations of late Antiquity. Some of his works were translated into late Latin or into Arabic. NLM/Durling 256; Norman 62; Waller 458; Wellcome I:392.


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