3 pages, 4to, lined paper. Fine. TWO MONTHS AFTER GETTYSBURG, ANOTHER HERO OF LITTLE ROUND TOP PRAISES CHAMBERLAIN. Rice had commanded the 44th New York at the crucial Little Round Top fight on the second day of Gettysburg; he was promoted to Brigadier General on 17 August. Here, he warmly urges Senator Fessenden to seek a similar honor for Chamberlain, based on "my personal knowledge of this gallant officer's skill and bravery upon the battle field." Arguing that "not a battle has been fought in which the 20th Maine under his command has not added luster to our arms, and a brighter page to our history," Rice draws particular attention to Chamberlain's role at Gettysburg, when "he held the extreme left of our entire line...The conduct of this Regiment at...Gettysburg has...rendered the prowess of the arms of your state imperishable...Washington shall make him a General, for his magnificent gallantry upon the ward-won field of Gettysburg..." He vows that "history will give credit to [their] bravery and unflinching fortitude, more than to any other equal body of men upon the field..." At Gettysburg, Rice also performed heroically on Little Round Top, when command of a brigade devolved on him. At Spotsylvania in May 1864, he was severely wounded in the leg, necessitating amputation. When the surgeon asked Rice on which side he would rest more comfortably, he replied: "Turn my face to the enemy." Ironically he died from the operation. " /> [CIVIL WAR, CHAMBERLAIN, J.L.]. RICE, James Clay (1829-1864). Autograph letter signed ("James C. Rice") as Brigadier General, to Maine Senator William P. Fessenden, Headquarters, Army of the Potomac, 8 September 1863. <I>3 pages, 4to, lined paper.</I> Fine. TWO MONTHS AFTER GETTYSBURG, ANOTHER HERO OF LITTLE ROUND TOP PRAISES CHAMBERLAIN. Rice had commanded the 44th New York at the crucial Little Round Top fight on the second day of Gettysburg; he was promoted to Brigadier General on 17 August. Here, he warmly urges Senator Fessenden to seek a similar honor for Chamberlain, based on "my personal knowledge of this gallant officer's skill and bravery upon the battle field." Arguing that "not a battle has been fought in which the 20th Maine under his command has not added luster to our arms, and a brighter page to our history," Rice draws particular attention to Chamberlain's role at Gettysburg, when "he held the extreme left of our entire line...The conduct of this Regiment at...Gettysburg has...rendered the prowess of the arms of your state imperishable...Washington shall make him a General, for his magnificent gallantry upon the ward-won field of Gettysburg..." He vows that "history will give credit to [their] bravery and unflinching fortitude, more than to any other equal body of men upon the field..." At Gettysburg, Rice also performed heroically on Little Round Top, when command of a brigade devolved on him. At Spotsylvania in May 1864, he was severely wounded in the leg, necessitating amputation. When the surgeon asked Rice on which side he would rest more comfortably, he replied: "Turn my face to the enemy." Ironically he died from the operation. | Christie's