• The Exceptional Sale 2011 auction at Christies

    Sale 8033

    The Exceptional Sale 2011

    7 July 2011, London, King Street

  • Lot 30

    DEMIDOFF SERVICE
    A FRENCH-EMPIRE SILVER-GILT DINNER-SERVICE

    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817, THE APPLIED ARMS WITH MARK OF CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK, LONDON, 1863

    Price Realised  

    DEMIDOFF SERVICE
    A FRENCH-EMPIRE SILVER-GILT DINNER-SERVICE
    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817, THE APPLIED ARMS WITH MARK OF CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK, LONDON, 1863
    Comprising the following, each as detailed fully on the following pages:

    a.) A Massive Silver-Gilt Tureen
    24 in. (61 cm.) high
    546 oz. (16,984 gr.)


    b.) A Pair of Massive Silver-Gilt Tureens
    18½ in. (47 cm.) high
    937 oz. (29,131 gr.)

    c.) A Pair of Massive Silver-Gilt Soup-Tureens
    15½ in. (39 cm.)high
    584 oz. (18,170 gr.)

    d.) A Pair of Silver-Gilt Wine-Coolers
    8¼ in. (21 cm.) high
    213 oz. (6,609 gr.)

    e.) A Silver-Gilt Fountain
    20 in. (51 cm.) high
    gross weight 461 oz. (14,336 gr.)

    f.) A Silver-Gilt Verrière
    17½ in. (44.5 cm.) long
    119 oz. (3,713 gr.)

    g.) A Set of Six Silver-Gilt Wine Coasters
    5 in. (13 cm.) diam.
    50 oz. (1,543 gr.)

    h.) A Pair of Silver-Gilt Dishes and Covers
    11¾ in. (29.7 cm.) diam.
    147 oz. (4,570 gr.)

    i.) A Silver-Gilt Dessert-Stand
    11¾ in. (30 cm.) high
    55 oz. (1,717 gr.)

    j.) A Pair of Mustard-Vases
    5¾ in. (14.6 cm.) wide
    66 oz. (2,049 gr.)


    a.)
    A MASSIVE FRENCH-EMPIRE SILVER-GILT TUREEN AND COVER (POT-A OILLE)
    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817, AFTER A DESIGN OF A.-L.-M. CAVELIER, THE APPLIED ARMS WITH MARK OF CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK, LONDON, 1863
    The circular base cast and chased with a band of stylised foliage on a matted ground, the hemispherical bowl supported on cast figures of Ceres, Bacchus and Fame, the bowl applied with a band of trailing vines, dolphins and bulrushes, with Bacchic female mask and double serpent handles, the domed cover with foliage and bud finial, with plain liner with shell grips, the cover applied twice and the base applied once with two coats-of-arms accolé below a coronet, marked under base, on base, under bowl, inside cover, on cover bezel and on liner, the base further stamped 'J. Bte. Cde. Odiot', the coats-of-arms each marked underneath
    24 in. (61 cm.) high
    546 oz. (16,984 gr.)

    PROVENANCE:
    Delivered to Count Nikolai Demidoff (1773-1828) 5 December 1817 (one of two pots-à-oille) and then by descent to his son
    Anatole Demidoff, Prince of San Donato (1812-1870), probably until circa 1863.
    with Charles Frederick Hancock, London, by 1863.
    Count Alfred de la Chapelle, Seigneur of Morton and Beaulieu, Périgord (1830-1914).
    An English Gentleman of Title, The Anderson Galleries, New York, 15 December, 1928, either lot 42 or 43.
    The late Mrs Anna Thomson Dodge, removed from Rose Terrace, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan; Christie's, London, 23 June, 1971, lot 50.

    The second pot-à-oille was formerly in the collection of Audrey B. Love and gifted by her to the French nation.



    b.)
    A PAIR OF MASSIVE FRENCH-EMPIRE SILVER-GILT TUREENS
    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817, AFTER A DESIGN OF A.-L.-M. CAVELIER, THE APPLIED ARMS WITH MARK OF CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK, LONDON, 1863
    Each oval and on oval base, cast and chased with a band of stylised foliage on a matted ground, the oval bowl supported on a pair of cast winged kneeling figures of winged Victory, the bowl applied with a band of trailing vines, the slightly domed cover with foliage and bud finial, the plain liner with shell grips, the base and cover each applied twice with two coats-of-arms accolé below a coronet each marked marked under base, on base, near rim, inside cover, on cover bezel and on liner, the bases further stamped 'J. Bte. Cde. Odiot' the liners further stamped 'Odiot', the coats-of-arms each marked underneath
    18½ in. (47 cm.) high
    937 oz. (29,131 gr.)

    PROVENANCE:
    Delivered to Count Nikolai Demidoff (1773-1828) 5 December 1817 (one of two terrine 2 femmes ailés a Genoux) and then by descent to his son
    Anatole Demidoff, Prince of San Donato (1812-1870), probably until circa 1863.
    with Charles Frederick Hancock, London, by 1863.
    Count Alfred de la Chapelle, Seigneur of Morton and Beaulieu, Périgord (1830-1914).
    An English Gentleman of Title, The Anderson Galleries, New York, 15 December, 1928, lot 45 (one).
    Anonymous sale; Christie's, Geneva, 9 November 1976, lot 277 (one).
    British Rail Pension Fund; Sotheby's, Geneva, 14 November 1988, lot 123 (one).



    c.)
    A PAIR OF MASSIVE FRENCH-EMPIRE SILVER-GILT TUREENS, COVERS AND LINERS (COUPES D'ENTREMENTS)
    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817, AFTER A DESIGN OF A.-L.-M. CAVELIER, THE APPLIED ARMS WITH MARK OF CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK, LONDON, 1863
    Each circular and on circular base, cast and chased with a band of stylised foliage on matted ground, the oval bowl supported on a pair of cast winged kneeling figures of Victory, the bowl applied with a band of trailing vines, the slightly domed cover with foliage and bud finial, the base and cover each applied with two coats-of-arms accolé below a coronet, marked under base, on base, under bowl, inside cover, on cover bezel and on liner, the base further stamped 'J. Bte. Cde. Odiot', the liners further stamped 'Odiot', the coats-of-arms each marked underneath
    15½ in. (39 cm.) high
    584 oz. (18,170 gr.)

    PROVENANCE:
    Delivered to Count Nikolai Demidoff (1773-1828) 5 December 1817 (two of four coupes femmes à genoux) and then by descent to his son
    Anatole Demidoff, Prince of San Donato (1812-1870), probably until circa 1863.
    with Charles Frederick Hancock, London, by 1863.
    Count Alfred de la Chapelle, Seigneur of Morton and Beaulieu, Périgord (1830-1914).
    An English Gentleman of Title, The Anderson Galleries, New York, 15 December, 1928, either lot 46 or 47.
    The Audrey B. Love Foundation, from the Collection of C. Ruxton Love;
    Christie's, New York, 14 June 1982, lot 143.

    The second pair of coupes femmes à genoux were formerly in the collection of Audrey B. Love and gifted by her to the French nation.




    d.)
    A PAIR OF FRENCH-EMPIRE SILVER-GILT WINE OR FRUIT COOLERS AND LINERS
    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817, THE APPLIED ARMS WITH MARK OF CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK, LONDON, 1863
    Each on detachable circular base, chased with a band of laurel leaves and supported by four cast infant bacchanals, each applied on each side with Eros riding a seahorse and with a band of interlacing vines, foliage and bulrushes above and with winged swan head handles, with detachable plain liners, each applied under each handle with two coats-of-arms accolé below a coronet, marked under base, near rim and on liner, one base further 'J. Bbte. Cde. Odiot', the coats-of-arms each marked underneath
    8¼ in. (21 cm.) high
    213 oz. (6,609 gr.)

    PROVENANCE:
    Delivered to Count Nikolai Demidoff (1773-1828) 5 December 1817 (2 seaux de depart en vermeil) and then by descent to his son
    Anatole Demidoff, Prince of San Donato (1812-1870), probably until circa 1863.
    with Charles Frederick Hancock, London, by 1863.
    Count Alfred de la Chapelle, Seigneur of Morton and Beaulieu, Périgord (1830-1914).
    An English Gentleman of Title, The Anderson Galleries, New York, 15 December, 1928, lot 41.
    The Audrey B. Love Foundation, from the Collection of C. Ruxton Love;
    Christie's, New York, 14 June 1982, lot 142.





    e.)
    A FRENCH-EMPIRE SILVER-GILT FOUNTAIN
    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817, THE APPLIED ARMS WITH MARK OF CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK, LONDON, 1863
    On partly-fluted square base, with egg and dart cast knop, the campana-shaped body applied with a procession of classical bacchic figures surrounding Bacchus being drawn by panthers in his chariot, with leaf-capped scroll and dolphin mask handles, applied below the rim with a band of trailing vines, the slightly domed cover with bud and foliage finial, with lion cast spout and mother-of-pearl mother gilt metal tap, the plain liner with drop ring handles, the cover applied with two coats-of-arms accolé below a coronet, marked under base, on base, near rim, inside cover and under liner, the base and inside cover further stamped 'J. Bbte. Cde. Odiot', liner further stamped 'Odiot', the coats-of-arms each marked underneath
    20 in. (51 cm.) high
    gross weight 461 oz. (14,336 gr.)

    PROVENANCE:
    Count Nikolai Demidoff (1773-1828) and then by descent to his son
    Anatole Demidoff, Prince of San Donato (1812-1870), probably until circa 1863.
    with Charles Frederick Hancock, London, by 1863.
    Count Alfred de la Chapelle, Seigneur of Morton and Beaulieu, Périgord (1830-1914).
    An English Gentleman of Title, The Anderson Galleries, New York, 15 December, 1928, lot 48.
    The late Mrs Anna Thomson Dodge, removed from Rose Terrace, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan; Christie's, London, 23 June, 1971, lot 49.
    Anonymous sale; Christie's, Geneva, 9 November 1976, lot 278.



    f.)
    A FRENCH-EMPIRE SILVER-GILT VERRIERE
    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817, THE APPLIED ARMS WITH MARK OF CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK, LONDON, 1863
    Shaped oval and on spreading foot, cast and chased with foliage and applied below the rim with a band of trailing vines, bacchic female masks, dolphins and bulrushes, the rim with cast openwork intertwined dolphin on each notch, applied with handles cast as mermaids, with detachable plain liner, applied on each side with two coats-of-arms accolé below a coronet, marked under base, on foot and under liner, the base further stamped 'J. Bbte. Cde. Odiot', the coats-of-arms each marked underneath
    17½ in. (44.5 cm.) long
    119 oz. (3,713 gr.)

    PROVENANCE:
    Delivered to Count Nikolai Demidoff (1773-1828) on 5 December 1817 (one of two verrieres idem avec double fond) and then by descent to his son
    Anatole Demidoff, Prince of San Donato (1812-1870), probably until circa 1863.
    with Charles Frederick Hancock, London, by 1863.
    Count Alfred de la Chapelle, Seigneur of Morton and Beaulieu, Périgord (1830-1914).
    An English Gentleman of Title, The Anderson Galleries, New York, 15 December, 1928, lot 27 or 28.
    The late Mrs Anna Thomson Dodge, removed from Rose Terrace, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan; Christie's, London, 23 June, 1971, lot 52.




    g.)
    A SET OF SIX FRENCH EMPIRE SILVER-GILT WINE-COASTERS (PORT BOUTEILLE)
    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817
    Each circular, with milled and gadrooned borders, the sides pierced with fruiting trailing vines, engraved with two coats-of-arms accolé below a coronet, each marked under base and on side, the bases further stamped 'Odiot'
    5 in. (13 cm.) diam.
    50 oz. (1,543 gr.)

    PROVENANCE:
    Deliverd to Count Nikolai Demidoff (1773-1828) on 5 December 1817 (six of sixteen porte bouteille cisellé des deux cots) and then by descent to his son
    Anatole Demidoff, Prince of San Donato (1812-1870), probably until circa 1863
    Charles Frederick Hancock, London, 1863
    Count Alfred de la Chapelle, Seigneur of Morton and Beaulieu, Prigord (1830-1914).
    An English Gentleman of Title, The Anderson Galleries, New York, 15 December, 1928, three from lots 16-22.
    The late Mrs. Anna Thomson Dodge, removed from Rose Terrace, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan; Christie's, London, 23 June, 1971, lot 56 (4). The Audrey B. Love Foundation, from the Collection of C. Ruxton Love; Christie's, New York, 14 June 1982, lot 140 (2).



    h.)
    A PAIR OF FRENCH EMPIRE SILVER-GILT DISHES AND COVERS
    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817, THE APPLIED ARMS WITH MARK OF CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK, LONDON, 1863
    The dishes each circular, with anthemion borders, engraved with two coats-of-arms accolé below a coronet, the covers each domed applied with a band of fruiting grapevines interspersed with flowers, with foliage and bud finials, each applied twice with two coats-of-arms accolé below a coronet, marked under dishes, on borders, inside covers and on borders, the dishes each further stamped underneath 'Odiot'
    11¾ in. (29.7 cm.) diam.
    147 oz. (4,570 gr.)

    PROVENANCE:
    Count Nikolai Demidoff (1773-1828) and then by descent to his son
    Anatole Demidoff, Prince of San Donato (1812-1870), probably until circa 1863.
    with Charles Frederick Hancock, London, by 1863.
    Count Alfred de la Chapelle, Seigneur of Morton and Beaulieu, Périgord (1830-1914).
    An English Gentleman of Title, the Anderson Galleries, New York, 15 December, 1928, lot 23.
    The late Mrs Anna Thomson Dodge, removed from Rose Terrace, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan; Christie's, London, 23 June, 1971, lot 54.



    i.)
    A FRENCH EMPIRE SILVER-GILT DESSERT-STAND
    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817
    On square base with four foliage-capped lion's paw feet, cast and chased with a bands of palmettes surrounded by foliage scrolls and on a matted ground, applied below the bowl rim with a band of trailing vines, bacchic female masks, dolphins and bulrushes, with winged demi-putto handles, engraved twice with two coats-of-arms accolé below a coronet, marked under base, on bowl and near rim
    11¾ in. (30 cm.) high
    55 oz. (1,717 gr.)

    PROVENANCE:
    Count Nikolai Demidoff (1773-1828) and then by descent to his son
    Anatole Demidoff, Prince of San Donato (1812-1870), probably until circa 1863.
    with Charles Frederick Hancock, London, by 1863.
    Count Alfred de la Chapelle, Seigneur of Morton and Beaulieu, Périgord (1830-1914).
    An English Gentleman of Title, The Anderson Galleries, New York, 15 December, 1928, lot 23.
    A Collector; Christie's, New York, 29 April 1987, lot 235.



    j.)
    A PAIR OF FRENCH EMPIRE SILVER-GILT MUSTARD-VASES
    MARK OF JEAN-BAPTISTE-CLAUDE ODIOT, PARIS, 1817, THE APPLIED ARMS WITH MARK OF CHARLES FREDERICK HANCOCK, LONDON, 1863
    Each rectangular plinth on four foliage and flower-capped lion's paw feet, each supporting the cast classical female figure holding a vase with an engraved band of fruiting vines, with plain liner, each applied with two coats-of-arms accolé below a coronet, each marked under base, on base, on base of vase and under liner
    5¾ in. (14.6 cm.) long
    66 oz. (2,049 gr.)

    PROVENANCE:
    Count Nikolai Demidoff (1773-1828) and then by descent to his son
    Anatole Demidoff, Prince of San Donato (1812-1870), probably until circa 1863.
    with Charles Frederick Hancock, London, 1863.
    Count Alfred de la Chapelle, Seigneur of Morton and Beaulieu, Périgord (1830-1914).
    An English Gentleman of Title, The Anderson Galleries, New York, 15 December, 1928, lot 50.
    A Collector; Christie's, New York, 29 April 1987, lot 234.
    total gross weight 3,177 oz. (98,820 gr.) (20)


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    Pre-Lot Text

    The Demidoff Service

    The Demidoff Service has been researched and discussed extensively by Anthony Phillips and Jeanne Sloane in their exhibtion catalogue, Antiquity Revisted, English and French Silver-Gilt from the Collection of Audrey Love, London, 1997. The quality of the service as the present lots attest, make it one of the most magnificent French services produced in the early 19th century. Count Nikolai Demidoff (1773-1828), for whom it was made, was born near St Petersburg in 1773, son of Nikita Akinfiyevich Demidoff (1724-1786) and his third wife Alexandra Safonova. His father died when he was only fifteen at which time he inherited the family's industrial empire, consisting of some eight metallurgical factories as well as mines in the Urals and Siberia. They were said to have produced a huge annual income and emplyed some 12,000 serfs. The young Demidoff began to spend so recklessly that the government had to send in the receivers.

    In September 1795 at St Petersburg he married Baroness Elisabeta Alexandrovna Stroganoff (1779-1818). The couple had two sons, Pavel Nikolaievich (1798-1840) and Anatoly (1812-1869). Nikolai entered the diplomatic service and the young couple moved to Paris, becoming ardent supporters of Napoleon I of France and setting up home in the hôtel de Brancas-Lauragais, at the corner of rue Taitbout and Boulevard des Italiens. However, rising Franco-Russian tensions forced his recall and they moved back to Russia via Italy, arriving in 1812. He fought with distinction in the Russo-Turkish War (1806-1812) and at the start of the French invasion of Russia he financed the creation of an infantry regiment, which he then commanded against Napoleon's forces, fighting at Oravais and Borodino.

    Demidoff returned to Paris in 1815 where his house soon became a centre for leading academic and literary figures of his day. In 1819 he was made Russian Ambassador to the court of Tuscany. Having divorced his wife, who moved back to France, he lived his last years between France and Italy among scholars, financing the creation of schools, hospitals and other charitable institutions in Tuscany. He bought 42 acres of marshland north of Florence from the Catholic Church and there built the Villa San Donato from 1827 to 1831 where he set up richly-decorated private rooms to house his enormous art collection, which was divided between his residences in San Donato, St Petersburg, Paris and Moscow. By decree of Leopold II of Tuscany, on 23 February 1827 Demidoff was made Count of San Donato for the services he had rendered to Tuscany.

    Jean-Baptiste-Claude Odiot

    It is not surprising that Demidoff turned to the Maison Odiot to order a silver-gilt service. The firm, which can trace its origins back to 1690, came to its greatest glory under the leadership of Jean-Baptiste-Claude Odiot, the grandson of the founder, Jean-Baptiste-Gaspard Odiot. Born in 1763 and becoming a master in 1785, Odiot succeeded his father in the business, steadily building the firm's reputation, coming to particular notice following the Exposition de l'industrie held in Paris in 1802. Following the bankruptcy, in 1809, of the celebrated neoclassical silversmith Henry Auguste, who at the time was the silversmith to Emperor Napoleon, Odiot was able to purchase many of his models and designs.

    Soon Odiot was receiving orders from the French court, including a service made for Napoleon's mother, styled 'Madame Mère', much of which was exhibited London, Christie's, The Glory of the Goldsmith, 1989, nos. 17 and 18, as well as from across Europe and beyond. The Russian Imperial court's love affair with French silver, most famously realised in the service made for Catherine the Great from the Parisian silversmith Jacques Roettiers and his son Jacques-Nicolas Roettiers in 1770 and subsequently presented to her lover Count Gregory Orloff (see Christie's, New York, 19 April 2002, lot 74), continued with commissions from the Russian court to Odiot. Among these important commissions were a massive service for Countess Branicki, the niece of Gregory Potemkin, (see Christie's, London, 12 June 2007, lots 120-122).

    The account books which remain in the archives of Odiot record that the service, of which the present lot includes many of the principle pieces, was ordered by 'M. de Demidoff', with the most important part of the service being delivered on 5 October 1817. It has been said of the Demidoff service that the individual objects 'are not so much dishes and cruet frames as they are fully realised small sculptures. The technical brilliance of these figures was due ... to the extraordinarily coordinated system that integrated the skills of the fondeurs-ciselleurs with those of the silversmiths' (C. le Corbeiller, 'An Introduction to Napoleonic Silver', The Arts Under Napoleon, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1978
    ). The records of Maison Odiot indicate that a considerable number of artists were employed on the service, including designers Cavelier, Prud'hon, Moreau and Garneray, and modellers Chaudet, Dumont and Roquier (J.-M. Pinçon and O. Gaube du Gers, Odiot l'orfévre, Paris, 1990).

    Some elements of the design of the Demidoff service, particularly the major tureens, can be seen as a celebration of the defeat of Napoleon - a victory in which Demidoff had played his part (The Glory of the Goldsmith, Christie's, London, 1989, p.36). For example, the kneeling Nike figures beneath the tureens and the figures of Fame, Bacchus and Ceres supporting the bowls of the pot-à-oille can be seen in this light. It is somewhat ironic that the most "Napoleonic" of services should include elements celebrating his defeat, and that just two years afterward it was exhibited at the Louvre. The catalogue for this exhibition, l'Exposition des produits de l'industrie française au Louvre stated that 'It has been a pleasure to see a fine silver-gilt service ordered by M. Demidoff, for which the estimated price is not less than 130,000 francs, Sixty pieces were counted, all decorated with bas-reliefs in exquisite taste, of subjects representing festivities. The main vases are supported by perfectly designed and worked figures, representing Bacchus, Ceres, Pomone ect. It is doubtful whether the art of the silversmith as ever produced anything more magnificent' (Ibid, p. 36 where the French text is translated).

    The Later History of the Service

    On the death of Count Nikolai Demidoff in 1828 the service presumably passed to his second son Anatole Demidoff. The younger Demidoff was born near St Petersburg, as his father had been, but grew up in Paris. His western upbringing led him to move away from his Russian ancestry and by the time of his father's death in 1828 he had more or less settled entirely in Europe, splitting his time between Paris, Rome and Venice. This attitude alienated him from Tsar Nicholas I of Russia, who always had an antipathy towards him. Following in his father's footsteps Anatole was interested in scholarship and as a result of his support was created Prince of San Donato in 1837. He also considerably expanded the Demidoff collection assembled by his father at the Villa San Donato near Florence, being particularly interested in Romantic art for example buying, at the Paris Salon of 1834 Paul Delaroche's The Execution of Lady Jane Grey (now in the National Gallery, London). His collection was dospersed throught public and private sales in Paris starting in 1863 and it seems likely that the Demidoff service was one of the earliest pieces to leave the collection, having been with the London based Gentleman dealer Charles Frederick Hancock by 1863.

    Charles Frederick Hancock was baptised in Birmingham in November 1807, going on to become a partner in the firm of Hunt and Roskell, one of the top silversmiths of the first half of the 19th century. He set up on his own by 1849 and soon was advertising himself as 'Jeweller and Silversmith to the principle sovereigns of Europe'. In this capacity it seems probably that he became acquainted with Prince Demidoff and likely purchased the Demidoff service directly from him. Hancock would seem to have wasted no time finding a buyer for the service as the applied arms are marked with London hallmarks for 1863. The arms had for many years remained something of a mystery, though research by French heraldry expert Philippe Palasi showed the arms to be those de la Chapelle, as borne by Alfred de la Chapelle (1830-1914) Count of Morton and Beaulieu in Périgord.

    Alfred de la Chapelle was a colourful explorer, adventurer, soldier, journalist and politician. As a young man he joined the California gold rush, but made his mining fortune at Coscopera, Mexico, in the 1850s. In 1859 he returned to France and met the Empress of Russia among others. Obviously a restless individual, by 1860 de la Chapelle had emigrated to Australia where by 1867 he was back in the mining industry. In 1863 he is recorded as acknowledging an illegitimate son, Octave Xavier Alfred, whose mother Kate Royal was a twenty-year old from Manchester. In 1889 the birth of a second child, Antoinette-Aline-Andrea de Morton de la Chapelle, was recorded at the French consulate in Dublin. Alfred de la Chapelle died in Essex in 1914, when it appears that the silver-gilt service was acquired by an Englishman, presumably the "Gentleman of Title" cited in the New York auction catalogue in 1928.

    It is extraordinary that the service survived intact until the sale in New York in 1928 and even more so that so many of the principle pieces have been reunited nearly a century after being separated.

    THE PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN