2 pp., 4to, ruled paper. WARTIME ELECTIONEERING BY UNION GENERALS A fascinating letter--evidently drafted as a campaign statement. Dennis had been nominated as a Congressional candidate for Carlyle, Illinois and he thanks his fellow citizens for the honor, and goes on to say: "As old party issues are now dead would it not be well for candidates to answer a few questions in which all are interested at this time....1. Are you in favour of the prosecution of the war for the restoration of National Authority? 2. Will you if elected to Congress vote men and money to prosecute the war with vigor? 3. Will you if elected to Congress vote for an amendment to the Constitution to be submitted to the States for ratification prohibiting slavery throughout the country? 4. Are you in favor of suppressing the rebellion at every cost and at all hazards? I will answer yes to all the above and would not if at home vote for any man who would not answer Yes I will..."Dennis, as it happens, was not summoned by the people to Congress, but played key roles in the siege of Vicksburg and the operations against Mobile. -- DIX, John Adams (1798-1879), General, U. S. Army. ALS ("John A. Dix") to John W. Edmonds, New York, 15 October 1864. 2 pp., 8vo., ruled paper. "I thank you for your kind letter. I expect nothing from it during the canvass. But I hope it will make people think, and, by a careful review of the past, suggest remedies for existing evils. We must have a re-organization of the democracy. Its present leaders lack sagacity, disinterestedness and courage; and without these there can be no bold or manly action in regard to great public questions." Dix's reference to "the democracy" was 19th century usage for the Democratic Party, and his diagnosis of its failings was right on the mark, as evidenced by the series of hapless candidates they put forward for president during and after the war: McClellan, Seymour, and Greeley. Together two items. (2) " /> DENNIS, Elias S. (1812-1894), <I>General, U. S. Army</I>. ALS ("Elias S. Dennis") to "Dear Friend," Headquarters, 1st Div., 17 a c, Vicksburg, Miss., 5 June 1864. <I>2 pp., 4to, ruled paper</I>. WARTIME ELECTIONEERING BY UNION GENERALS A fascinating letter--evidently drafted as a campaign statement. Dennis had been nominated as a Congressional candidate for Carlyle, Illinois and he thanks his fellow citizens for the honor, and goes on to say: "As old party issues are now dead would it not be well for candidates to answer a few questions in which all are interested at this time....1. Are you in favour of the prosecution of the war for the restoration of National Authority? 2. Will you if elected to Congress vote men and money to prosecute the war with vigor? 3. Will you if elected to Congress vote for an amendment to the Constitution to be submitted to the States for ratification prohibiting slavery throughout the country? 4. Are you in favor of suppressing the rebellion at every cost and at all hazards? I will answer yes to all the above and would not if at home vote for any man who would not answer Yes I will..."Dennis, as it happens, was not summoned by the people to Congress, but played key roles in the siege of Vicksburg and the operations against Mobile. -- DIX, John Adams (1798-1879), <I>General, U. S. Army</I>. ALS ("John A. Dix") to John W. Edmonds, New York, 15 October 1864. <I>2 pp., 8vo., ruled paper</I>. "I thank you for your kind letter. I expect nothing from it during the canvass. But I hope it will make people think, and, by a careful review of the past, suggest remedies for existing evils. We must have a re-organization of the democracy. Its present leaders lack sagacity, disinterestedness and courage; and without these there can be no bold or manly action in regard to great public questions." Dix's reference to "the democracy" was 19th century usage for the Democratic Party, and his diagnosis of its failings was right on the mark, as evidenced by the series of hapless candidates they put forward for president during and after the war: McClellan, Seymour, and Greeley. <I>Together two items</I>. (2) | Christie's