1 page, folio, ON FINE PARCHMENT, large cut-paper official seal in top left corner, accomplished in a neat clerical hand, finely framed with engraved portrait. President Franklin grants Joseph Swift the "Morris" tract in Greenwood, Pennsylvania, with a fine, clear Franklin signature. Franklin had only recently returned from France: he left Passy on 12 July and arrived in Philadelphia on 14 September, 1785. He wasted no time returning to public affairs, serving as president of his state's executive council until taking a seat in the Constitutional Convention in May 1787. He was unhappy with the plan hammered out that long, hot summer, yet put his name to the charter, just as he had overcome his earlier misgivings about independence and signed the Declaration. "The older I grow," he told his younger compatriots at the 1787 Convention, "the more apt I am to doubt my own judgment." He signed, he said, to "make manifest our unanimity." The document is also signed by John Armstrong, Jr. (1758-1843), a leading Pennsylvania politician and colorful military figure in the Revolution and the War of 1812, he was blamed for the British torching of Washington and forced to resign. " /> FRANKLIN, Benjamin (1706-1790), <I>Signer (Pennsylvania)</I>. Document signed ("B. Franklin, Presid.," with flourish), as President of the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania, COUNTERSIGNED BY JOHN ARMSTRONG JR., [Philadelphia], 20 October 1785. <I>1 page, folio,</I> ON FINE PARCHMENT, <I>large cut-paper official seal in top left corner, accomplished in a neat clerical hand, finely framed with engraved portrait</I>. President Franklin grants Joseph Swift the "Morris" tract in Greenwood, Pennsylvania, with a fine, clear Franklin signature. Franklin had only recently returned from France: he left Passy on 12 July and arrived in Philadelphia on 14 September, 1785. He wasted no time returning to public affairs, serving as president of his state's executive council until taking a seat in the Constitutional Convention in May 1787. He was unhappy with the plan hammered out that long, hot summer, yet put his name to the charter, just as he had overcome his earlier misgivings about independence and signed the Declaration. "The older I grow," he told his younger compatriots at the 1787 Convention, "the more apt I am to doubt my own judgment." He signed, he said, to "make manifest our unanimity." The document is also signed by John Armstrong, Jr. (1758-1843), a leading Pennsylvania politician and colorful military figure in the Revolution and the War of 1812, he was blamed for the British torching of Washington and forced to resign. | Christie's