Ludlow Castle at New York, 4 May 1758. 3 pages, 4to. Fine. "A GREAT MANY IRONS IN THE FIRE" FOR THE BRITISH OFFENSIVE OF 1758. Clark "had orders from the Lords of the Admiralty to Convoy the Virginia fleet home...but since have received orders from [Vice Admiral Philip] Durrell to join him in New York," where plans to take Louisburg are underway: "The Transports with 3000 Soldiers are sailed from Philadelphia for Halifax...Durrell proposes sailing tomorrow with a large Fleet of Transports & Ordinance Storeships.. & 2500 men..." Meanwhile "General Abercromby," Clark continues, "with some Regulars & a Large Body of Provincials, is to attack Conderago [Ticonderoga] & Crown Point; General Forbes...to the Southward is to attack Fort Duquesne; & 'tis generally believed here that both Louisbough & Quebec are likewise to be attacked...A great many Irons in the Fire at one time..." He adds that Sir Charles Hardy has taken several French vessels and that he expects to be ordered back to Virginia, but "should We continue with Admiral Boscawen," he will report any notable events. After forty-nine days of persistent bombing, Louisburg finally fell to the British on 26 July, but they suffered a major reversal on 8 July, when James Abercromby (1706-1781) failed to take Ticonderoga despite a huge advantage in troops. Brig. Genl. John Forbes (1710-1759), whose provincial troops were commanded by George Washington, took Fort Duquesne in November and renamed it Fort Pitt. " /> [FRENCH & INDIAN WAR]. CLARK, Edward, <I>Royal Navy.</I> Autograph letter signed ("Edw: Clark") to an unidentified correspondent, on board the British warship <I>Ludlow Castle</I> at New York, 4 May 1758. <I>3 pages, 4to.</I> Fine. "A GREAT MANY IRONS IN THE FIRE" FOR THE BRITISH OFFENSIVE OF 1758. Clark "had orders from the Lords of the Admiralty to Convoy the Virginia fleet home...but since have received orders from [Vice Admiral Philip] Durrell to join him in New York," where plans to take Louisburg are underway: "The Transports with 3000 Soldiers are sailed from Philadelphia for Halifax...Durrell proposes sailing tomorrow with a large Fleet of Transports & Ordinance Storeships.. & 2500 men..." Meanwhile "General Abercromby," Clark continues, "with some Regulars & a Large Body of Provincials, is to attack Conderago [Ticonderoga] & Crown Point; General Forbes...to the Southward is to attack Fort Duquesne; & 'tis generally believed here that both Louisbough & Quebec are likewise to be attacked...A great many Irons in the Fire at one time..." He adds that Sir Charles Hardy has taken several French vessels and that he expects to be ordered back to Virginia, but "should We continue with Admiral Boscawen," he will report any notable events. After forty-nine days of persistent bombing, Louisburg finally fell to the British on 26 July, but they suffered a major reversal on 8 July, when James Abercromby (1706-1781) failed to take Ticonderoga despite a huge advantage in troops. Brig. Genl. John Forbes (1710-1759), whose provincial troops were commanded by George Washington, took Fort Duquesne in November and renamed it Fort Pitt. | Christie's