1 p., 8vo., on stationery of Headquarters Army of the Potomac. THE WINNING GENERAL TALLIES THE DESERTERS FOR THE THREE-MONTHS AFTER GETTYSBURG. "Can you let me have tonight an approximate estimate of the number of deserters that have passed thro your dept & returned to their regiments since the 1st of last July & to the 1st inst." -- HOWARD, O. O. (1830-1909). ALS ("O. O. Howard") to E. B. Wheeler, Warrenton Junction, 31 July 1863. 1 p., 8vo., on stationery of Headquarters Eleventh Corps. A short letter: "In answer to your note, I have to say that I command the 11th Corps at present." -- DOUBLEDAY, Abner (1819-1893). ALS ("A. Doubleday") to Gen. Slough, Washington, D. C. 15 January 1864. 1 p., 4to. "General I enclose copies of two orders received by me to be transmitted to you." Howard unsuccessfully engaged A. P. Hill and Ewell's divisions on the first day, with the Confederates driving Howard's men south, through the town an onto Cemetery Ridge. During that same day's action, General John Reynolds was killed by a rebel sharpshooter, and Doubleday stepped in to take command of his I Corps. -- SICKLES, Daniel (1825-1914). ALS ("D. Sickles") Gov. Edward D. Morgan, Headquarters, Excelsior Brigade, Washington, D. C., 1 August 1861. 2 pp., 4to. SICKLES ORGANIZES HIS NEW YORK EXCELSIOR BRIGADE IN 1861: "I am anxious to add to my Command a small additional force of Artillery and Cavalry. It is in these arms that the Union Army is weakest, and I am satisfied that with your Excellency's cooperation I can raise & organize five Companies or Artillery and two squadrons of cavalry..." Sickles immortalized himself with his rash, unauthorized move forward on the second day. He succeeded in gaining higher ground, but exposed his flanks on either side leading to the brutal combat at the Peach Orchard, the Wheat Field and the Devil's Den, which cost him a leg. From 1886 to 1912 he chaired the N. Y. State Monuments Commission, and was instrumental in turning the Gettysburg site into the national museum it is today. He was removed that post, however, for misuse of funds. -- HANCOCK, Winfield Scott (1824-1886). ALS ("Win'd. S. Hancock") to Messrs. Spencer, Richardson & Thomson, Falmouth, Va., 24 January 1863. 1 page, 8vo. ONE OF THE UNION'S MOST FEROCIOUS FIGHTERS SENDS A STERN REQUEST TO HIS TAILOR, enclosing measurements (41-inch chest, 37-inch waist), and a demand for his new Brigadier's uniform to be "sent at once (forthwith) to Washington, D. C. I shall be at Willard's Hotel in 36 hours from now (not a moment's delay if you please)." One of his biographers, ironically enough, praised him as a "man of ability...who always has a clean white shirt (where he gets them nobody knows)..." (Boatner, 372). -- FREMONT, John C. (1813-1890). ALS ("J. C. Fremont") to J. W. Park, 4 July 1863. 1 p., 8vo. FREMONT IN NEW YORK CITY, REPORTS THE THIRD DAY'S FIGHTING: "Have you had the latest news? I do not know whether or not any Extra has been published, so give it to you. Meade dispatches, up to 8-½ last night says the enemy attacked his left center at one [in the] afternoon, concentrating 150 pieces of artillery at that point. Meade repulsed them twice (fighting lasted three hours) & took 3,000 prisoners. Thinking the enemy was withdrawing Meade made a reconnaissance in force on his left. So the business rested last night. This is all the reliable news. On this Mr. Lincoln issued [an] address to the country. Perhaps you have seen it already. Today there will have been a battle--very probably." Together 6 items. (6) " /> [GETTYSBURG] MEADE, George G. (1815-1872). ALS ("Geo. G. Meade") to Gen. M. R. Patrick, 27 October 1863. <I>1 p., 8vo., on stationery of Headquarters Army of the Potomac</I>. THE WINNING GENERAL TALLIES THE DESERTERS FOR THE THREE-MONTHS AFTER GETTYSBURG. "Can you let me have tonight an approximate estimate of the number of deserters that have passed thro your dept & returned to their regiments since the 1st of last July & to the 1st inst." -- HOWARD, O. O. (1830-1909). ALS ("O. O. Howard") to E. B. Wheeler, Warrenton Junction, 31 July 1863. <I>1 p., 8vo., on stationery of Headquarters Eleventh Corps</I>. A short letter: "In answer to your note, I have to say that I command the 11th Corps at present." -- DOUBLEDAY, Abner (1819-1893). ALS ("A. Doubleday") to Gen. Slough, Washington, D. C. 15 January 1864. <I>1 p., 4to</I>. "General I enclose copies of two orders received by me to be transmitted to you." Howard unsuccessfully engaged A. P. Hill and Ewell's divisions on the first day, with the Confederates driving Howard's men south, through the town an onto Cemetery Ridge. During that same day's action, General John Reynolds was killed by a rebel sharpshooter, and Doubleday stepped in to take command of his I Corps. -- SICKLES, Daniel (1825-1914). ALS ("D. Sickles") Gov. Edward D. Morgan, Headquarters, Excelsior Brigade, Washington, D. C., 1 August 1861. <I>2 pp., 4to</I>. SICKLES ORGANIZES HIS NEW YORK EXCELSIOR BRIGADE IN 1861: "I am anxious to add to my Command a small additional force of Artillery and Cavalry. It is in these arms that the Union Army is weakest, and I am satisfied that with your Excellency's cooperation I can raise & organize five Companies or Artillery and two squadrons of cavalry..." Sickles immortalized himself with his rash, unauthorized move forward on the second day. He succeeded in gaining higher ground, but exposed his flanks on either side leading to the brutal combat at the Peach Orchard, the Wheat Field and the Devil's Den, which cost him a leg. From 1886 to 1912 he chaired the N. Y. State Monuments Commission, and was instrumental in turning the Gettysburg site into the national museum it is today. He was removed that post, however, for misuse of funds. -- HANCOCK, Winfield Scott (1824-1886). ALS ("Win'd. S. Hancock") to Messrs. Spencer, Richardson & Thomson, Falmouth, Va., 24 January 1863. <I>1 page, 8vo</I>. ONE OF THE UNION'S MOST FEROCIOUS FIGHTERS SENDS A STERN REQUEST TO HIS TAILOR, enclosing measurements (41-inch chest, 37-inch waist), and a demand for his new Brigadier's uniform to be "sent <I>at once</I> (forthwith) to Washington, D. C. I shall be at Willard's Hotel in 36 hours from <I>now</I> (not a moment's delay if you please)." One of his biographers, ironically enough, praised him as a "man of ability...who always has a clean <I>white</I> shirt (where he gets them nobody knows)..." (Boatner, 372). -- FREMONT, John C. (1813-1890). ALS ("J. C. Fremont") to J. W. Park, 4 July 1863. <I>1 p., 8vo</I>. FREMONT IN NEW YORK CITY, REPORTS THE THIRD DAY'S FIGHTING: "Have you had the latest news? I do not know whether or not any Extra has been published, so give it to you. Meade dispatches, up to 8-½ last night says the enemy attacked his left center at one [in the] afternoon, concentrating 150 pieces of artillery at that point. Meade repulsed them twice (fighting lasted three hours) & took 3,000 prisoners. Thinking the enemy was withdrawing Meade made a reconnaissance in force on his left. So the business rested last night. This is all the reliable news. On this Mr. Lincoln issued [an] address to the country. Perhaps you have seen it already. Today there will have been a battle--very probably." <I>Together 6 items</I>. (6) | Christie's