. "CRUSH OUT THE REBELLION...IS STILL MY MOTTO." McPherson thanks Halleck for his promotion to brigadier general in the regular army. "I did not expect this promotion, but can assure you that I shall labor no less earnestly to merit it. I have ever tried to do the best I knew how, and put forth all my energies to crush out the 'Rebellion' and this is still my motto." By 1863, McPherson had already served as Grant's chief engineer in the western theatre, and fought at Forts Henry and Donelson, Shiloh and Corinth. He led the 13th and 17th Corps during the Vicksburg campaign, then commanded the Army of the Tennessee until killed in the battle of Atlanta, on 22 July 1864. Leaving the western theatre in 1864, Grant told Sherman that he and McPherson were "the men to whom, above all others, I feel indebted for whatever I have had of success" (quoted in Sherman: I, 399). -- SHERIDAN, Philip. ALS ("P. H. Sheridan") to C. C. Augur, Winchester, 28 July 1865. 2 pp., 8vo., Headquarters Midle Military Division. Sheridan encloses a letter from "Mrs. Seldon a lady who left the sinking ship and came to our lines. She wishes to go to Norfolk Va..." Together two items. (2) " /> [GRANT'S LIEUTENANTS] McPHERSON, James Birdseye. (1828-1864), Autograph letter signed ("Jas. B. Mcpherson") to Gen. H. W. Halleck, Vicksburg, 15 August 1863. pp., 4to., on stationery of Headquarters Seventeenth Army Corps, Department of the Tennessee</I>. "CRUSH OUT THE REBELLION...IS STILL MY MOTTO." McPherson thanks Halleck for his promotion to brigadier general in the regular army. "I did not expect this promotion, but can assure you that I shall labor no less earnestly to merit it. I have ever tried to do the best I knew how, and put forth all my energies to crush out the 'Rebellion' and this is still my motto." By 1863, McPherson had already served as Grant's chief engineer in the western theatre, and fought at Forts Henry and Donelson, Shiloh and Corinth. He led the 13th and 17th Corps during the Vicksburg campaign, then commanded the Army of the Tennessee until killed in the battle of Atlanta, on 22 July 1864. Leaving the western theatre in 1864, Grant told Sherman that he and McPherson were "the men to whom, above all others, I feel indebted for whatever I have had of success" (quoted in Sherman: I, 399). -- SHERIDAN, Philip. ALS ("P. H. Sheridan") to C. C. Augur, Winchester, 28 July 1865. <I>2 pp., 8vo., Headquarters Midle Military Division</I>. Sheridan encloses a letter from "Mrs. Seldon a lady who left the sinking ship and came to our lines. She wishes to go to Norfolk Va..." <I>Together two items</I>. (2) | Christie's