Together 3 pages, 4to. Two letters demonstrating the broad range of Hamilton's authority as first Secretary of the Treasury. In the first, he directs Delany to allocate certain funds: "[$8,300] is to be applied in payment of Pensions due to Invalids in the State of Pennsylvania." (The invalids were casualties of the Revolutionary War). The second, rather lengthy, letter offers Hamilton's decision on a customs claim: "I am always disposed to exercise the discretion that may be vested in me by the laws for the reasonable benefit of the fair traders..." But in the case of Mr. Bell and a spoiled shipment of salt, he lacks sufficient facts: "...If the salt were yet on board, or if the proportion of Foreign matter had been ascertained at the time of landing I should now have something to govern my opinion. But at this late day every thing rests on mere conjecture." He concludes: "Upon consideration of all the circumstances attending this case I am not satisfied that it is in my power to authorize an allowance to Mr. Bell." -- HAMILTON, Elizabeth. Letter signed ("Elizth Hamilton First Directress" et al) to L. Bradish, New York, [January, 1836]. 1 page, 4to, integral address panel, endorsed on verso, one minor marginal tear. Rare. A letter from the wife of Alexander Hamilton. As the Directoress of the Orphan Asylum, Society, she requests that Bradish petition the legislature "for a gift of $15,000 in order to assist...in building a more commodious house." Rare. (3) " /> HAMILTON, Alexander (1755-1804). Two letters signed ("Alexander Hamilton, Secy of the Treasury" "Alexander Hamilton" with flourish) both to Sharp Delany, Collector for Philadelphia, "Treasury Department," 1 March & 24 September 1790. <I>Together 3 pages, 4to.</I> Two letters demonstrating the broad range of Hamilton's authority as first Secretary of the Treasury. In the first, he directs Delany to allocate certain funds: "[$8,300] is to be applied in payment of Pensions due to Invalids in the State of Pennsylvania." (The invalids were casualties of the Revolutionary War). The second, rather lengthy, letter offers Hamilton's decision on a customs claim: "I am always disposed to exercise the discretion that may be vested in me by the laws for the reasonable benefit of the fair traders..." But in the case of Mr. Bell and a spoiled shipment of salt, he lacks sufficient facts: "...If the salt were yet on board, or if the proportion of Foreign matter had been ascertained at the time of landing I should now have something to govern my opinion. But at this late day every thing rests on mere conjecture." He concludes: "Upon consideration of all the circumstances attending this case I am not satisfied that it is in my power to authorize an allowance to Mr. Bell." -- HAMILTON, Elizabeth. Letter signed ("Elizth Hamilton First Directress" et al) to L. Bradish, New York, [January, 1836]. <I>1 page, 4to, integral address panel, endorsed on verso, one minor marginal tear.</I> Rare. A letter from the wife of Alexander Hamilton. As the Directoress of the Orphan Asylum, Society, she requests that Bradish petition the legislature "for a gift of $15,000 in order to assist...in building a more commodious house." Rare. (3) | Christie's