Philosophical collections must have circulated in much smaller numbers [than the Phil. trans.], complete sets of the seven numbers being now very uncommon, and it is probable that Hooke received little return for his trouble" (Keynes, p. 48). The third number contains two papers by Hooke, one an optical discourse for the short-sighted, and the other a mechanical discourse in which he describes the "best form of Horizontal Sayls for a Mill." The sixth number contains William Briggs' "Nova visionis theoria," a treatise on the physiology of vision which prompted Newton to reprint it with his own introduction in 1685. Garrison-Morton 1481.3 (Briggs); Keynes Hooke 24; Norman 1100. " /> HOOKE, Robert (1635-1702). <I>An Attempt to prove the Motion of the Earth from Observations</I>. London: T.R. for John Martyn, 1674. Engraved folding plate. Keynes <I>Hooke</I> 16; Wing H-2613; Wellcome III, p. 296; Norman 1093. -- <I>A Description of Helioscopes, and some other Instruments</I>. London: T.R. for John Martyn, 1676. 3 engravings on 2 folding plates. Keynes 19; Wing H-2614; Norman 1095. -- <I>Lampas: or, Descriptions of some Mechanical Improvements of Lamps & Waterpoises</I>. London: for John Martyn, 1677. 3 folding engraved plates (one a double-plate numbered tab. I & tab. II). Keynes<I>Hooke</I> 20; Wellcome III, P. 296; Wing H-2616; Norman 1096. -- <I>Lectures and Collections ... cometa ... microscopium</I>. London: for J. Martyn, 1678. 5 folding engraved plates. Keynes <I>Hooke</I> 22; NLM/Krivatsy 5957; Wing H-2618; Norman 1098. -- <I>Lectures de potentia restitutiva, or of Spring, explaining the Power of Springing Bodies</I>. London: for John Martyn, 1678. 3 engraved plates (2 folding). Keynes 21; Wing H-2619; Norman 1097. -- <I>Animadversions on the first part of the machina coelestis of ... Johannes Hevelius</I>. London: T.R. for John Martyn, 1674. 3 folding engraved plates. Keynes <I>Hooke</I> 18; Wellcome III, p. 296; Wing H-2611; Norman 1094. Together 6 works bound in one volume, all 4<V>o (each approximately 210 x 155). Engraved plates. (Some minor browning and spotting, occasional soiling.) Contemporary diced russia, covers with gilt borders, spine richly gilt (rebacked preserving original spine, corners worn). <I>Provenance</I>: occasional marginalia in an early hand. COMPLETE SET OF FIRST EDITIONS OF HOOKE'S SIX CULTERIAN LECTURES. In his preface to the first lecture, Hooke explained that the remaining lectures would be published in the same format so that they could be bound together (as here). The lectures were named in honor of Sir James Cutler, who founded a lectureship in mechanics for Hooke in 1664. The first lecture contains Hooke's reformulation of the approach to orbital dynamics. He recognized here for the first time that orbital motion did not depend on centrifugal force, but rather on the principle of rectilinear inertia. This discovery set Newton on the correct path to understanding orbital dynamics. The second Cutleriean lecture (bound here slightly out of order), <I>Animadversions on the first part of the machina coelestis</I>, contains the first descriptions of Hooke's clock-driven telescope and the first form of a universal joint. The <I>Lectures de potentia restitutiva</I>, the fifth published Cutlerian lecture, contains Hooke's law of elasticity--that stress is proportional to strain. The sixth and final published lecture, <I>Lectures and collections</I>, includes an account of the comet witnessed in April 1677. It also prints two letters from Leeuwenhoek concerning his miscroscopical examinations, and gives Hooke's own account of his improved microscopical methods. A RARE COMPLETE SET OF THESE IMPORTANT LECTURES. [<I>Bound with</I>:] HOOKE, Robert, editor (1635-1702). <I>Philosophical Collections</I>. Numbers 1-7 [all published]. London: for John Martin [no. 1], Moses Pitt [no. 2], Richard Chiswell [nos. 3-7], 1679-1682. 4<V>o. 7 engraved plates (5 folding), one full-page engraving on Z2r (part 5). (Some minor browning and spotting, occasional soiling.) RARE COMPLETE SET OF ISSUES. Following the death of Henry Oldenburg in 1677, regular publication of the <I>Philosophical Transactions</I> was interrupted. Hooke was authorized by the Council of the Royal Society to publish the <I>Philosophical Collections</I> during this period prior to its resumption in January 1682/3. "<I>Philosophical collections</I> must have circulated in much smaller numbers [than the <I>Phil. trans</I>.], complete sets of the seven numbers being now very uncommon, and it is probable that Hooke received little return for his trouble" (Keynes, p. 48). The third number contains two papers by Hooke, one an optical discourse for the short-sighted, and the other a mechanical discourse in which he describes the "best form of Horizontal Sayls for a Mill." The sixth number contains William Briggs' "Nova visionis theoria," a treatise on the physiology of vision which prompted Newton to reprint it with his own introduction in 1685. Garrison-Morton 1481.3 (Briggs); Keynes <I>Hooke</I> 24; Norman 1100. | Christie's