1 full page, 4to, 275 x 200 mm. (10 7/8 x 8 in.), integral address leaf in Jackson's hand, minor losses at folds. An intriguing letter concerning a legal problem: "Judge Bertram having differed from you on the subject, where it is best for the interest & security of the revenue, to vest the powers of the agent for the Treasury; I have thought it right to lay his words before you, and ask you to inform me, whether his reasoning has produced a change in your words to me on this subject, and whether, if his reasoning has not convinced you of the propriety of throwing this duty on the Atto[rney] Gen[era]l; whether a lone agency would not be better than to throw it on the first auditor. When you have leisure to attend to this subject, please...return to me the enclosed papers..." Provenance: Richards, 1981. " /> JACKSON, ANDREW, <I>President</I>. Autograph letter signed ("Andrew Jackson") as President, to Secretary of the Treasury [Samuel D. Ingham], n.p. [Washington, D.C.], 14 November 1829. <I>1 full page, 4to, 275 x 200 mm. (10 7/8 x 8 in.), integral address leaf in Jackson's hand, minor losses at folds</I>. An intriguing letter concerning a legal problem: "Judge Bertram having differed from you on the subject, where it is <I>best for</I> the interest & security of the revenue, to vest the powers of the agent for the Treasury; I have thought it right to lay his words before you, and ask you to inform me, whether his reasoning has produced a change in your words to me on this subject, and whether, if his reasoning has not convinced you of the propriety of throwing this duty on the Atto[rney] Gen[era]l; whether a lone agency would not be better than to throw it on the first auditor. When you have leisure to attend to this subject, please...return to me the enclosed papers..." <I>Provenance:</I> Richards, 1981. | Christie's