1 full page, 4to, integral blank. Fine. GUY JOHNSON REPORTS ON THE TRIBES OF THE SIX NATIONS. Guy, son of Sir William Johnson, had enlisted the Six Nations on the British side during the American Revolution, then returned to England to seek compensation for his services and his confiscated property. Here, he promises a lawyer a "...return of the Indians of the Six Nations Confederacy...having from my first entrance into that Superintendency endeavoured and at length effected such an arrangement among the Indians that I could always, and frequently did make returns as well to the Secy. of state as to the Commanders in Chief of the numbers of these people by Nations, with their Men, Women, & Children distinctly, as well as their Tribes if required, posting proper Officers to them... which had never been attempted before and which greatly facilitated all Military operations, enabling me to keep constantly 7, or 800 & sometimes more Warriors actively and Successfully employed against the Enemy." Johnson needs more time to compile his notes, having "lost many papers by various Accidents to which my movements exposed them..." Rare. " /> JOHNSON, Guy (1740-1788). <I>Loyalist, Superintendant of Indian Affairs</I>. Autograph letter signed (GJohnson"), to Evan Nepian, Esq., Villiers Street [London?], 28 December 1786. <I>1 full page, 4to, integral blank.</I> Fine. GUY JOHNSON REPORTS ON THE TRIBES OF THE SIX NATIONS. Guy, son of Sir William Johnson, had enlisted the Six Nations on the British side during the American Revolution, then returned to England to seek compensation for his services and his confiscated property. Here, he promises a lawyer a "...return of the Indians of the Six Nations Confederacy...having from my first entrance into that Superintendency endeavoured and at length effected such an arrangement among the Indians that I could always, and frequently did make returns as well to the Secy. of state as to the Commanders in Chief of the numbers of these people by Nations, with their Men, Women, & Children distinctly, as well as their Tribes if required, posting proper Officers to them... which had never been attempted before and which greatly facilitated all Military operations, enabling me to keep constantly 7, or 800 & sometimes more Warriors actively and Successfully employed against the Enemy." Johnson needs more time to compile his notes, having "lost many papers by various Accidents to which my movements exposed them..." Rare. | Christie's