1 page, folio, several tears, one crossing text repaired, creased, half green morocco slipcase. Lamb informs Hood that he and his sister Mary have been in town to see W[ordsworth?] and regretted not having had time to visit the Hoods at the Adelphi, commenting "if Mrs Hood is as desirous of seeing her [Mary], as she is of seeing Jane, my, what a meeting twill be! What hugging and collying! You and I are graver." He looks forward to Hood's forthcoming visit, as "Ducks are getting cheaper" and requests him to bring his Specimens of English Dramatic Poets (1808) and "also of both your best behaviours." -- LAMB, Mary Ann. Autograph letter signed ("M.Lamb") to Mrs. Clarkson, n.p., 25 December 1805. 2 full pages, 4to, quarter olive morocco slipcase. Fine. Writing on Christmas day, Mary voices "a kind of satisfaction that a sad, and dreary year, as this has been to me, and many of my best friends, is drawing to an end." She hopes to meet the Clarksons again in the New Year, together with their Grasmere friends and the poet Coleridge, from whom she has heard no news and has "not the most distant idea where it is probable he will land." She adds that her brother, Charles, also sends his respects "to Mr. Clarkson and yourself not forgetting our fellow-traveller...and our old friend Tom whom we do not like a bit the worse for being a little tall, a little awkward, and not over-passionately addicted to literature." Charles also wants "to hear about Mr. Clarkson's quaker book, in what state of forwardness it is." [LAMB, Charles]. Mock Autograph letter signed ("T. Hood Esq.") supposedly to "Dear Lamb," n.p., n.d. [autumn 1828?]. 1 page, small folio, tears, one crossing text without loss, creased, half green morocco slipcase. Lamb writes himself as Hood, beginning cryptically: "You are am impudent varlet, but I will keep your secret." He informs that he will be dining at Ayrlon's on Thursday and intends to stay with Sarah. He adds: "Mrs. M and her Tragedy may be damned so may not you and your rib." -- HOOD, Thomas. Autograph letter signed ("Tho.s Hood") to T. Freiling[?], Winchmore Hill near Enfield, 3 June 1830. 2 pages, 8vo, integral blank affixed to a cabinet portrait, half red morocco slipcase. Hood sends Lamb's Specimens of English Dramatic Poets, thinking he "will relish both the samples and the criticisms" and agree that "the fine dramatists of those days were quite worthy of being Shakespeare's playfellows." Together 4 items, enclosed in two morocco slipcases. (3) " /> LAMB, Charles. Autograph letter signed ("CL") to Thomas Hood (1799-1845), n.p., n.d. [postmarked 5 July 1828].<I>1 page, folio, several tears, one crossing text repaired, creased, half green morocco slipcase.</I> Lamb informs Hood that he and his sister Mary have been in town to see W[ordsworth?] and regretted not having had time to visit the Hoods at the Adelphi, commenting "if Mrs Hood is as desirous of seeing her [Mary], as she is of seeing Jane, my, what a meeting twill be! What hugging and collying! You and I are graver." He looks forward to Hood's forthcoming visit, as "Ducks are getting cheaper" and requests him to bring his <I>Specimens of English Dramatic Poets</I> (1808) and "also of both your best behaviours." -- LAMB, Mary Ann. Autograph letter signed ("M.Lamb") to Mrs. Clarkson, n.p., 25 December 1805. <I>2 full pages, 4to, quarter olive morocco slipcase.</I> Fine. Writing on Christmas day, Mary voices "a kind of satisfaction that a sad, and dreary year, as this has been to me, and many of my best friends, is drawing to an end." She hopes to meet the Clarksons again in the New Year, together with their Grasmere friends and the poet Coleridge, from whom she has heard no news and has "not the most distant idea where it is probable he will land." She adds that her brother, Charles, also sends his respects "to Mr. Clarkson and yourself not forgetting our fellow-traveller...and our old friend Tom whom we do not like a bit the worse for being a little tall, a little awkward, and not over-passionately addicted to literature." Charles also wants "to hear about Mr. Clarkson's quaker book, in what state of forwardness it is." [LAMB, Charles]. Mock Autograph letter signed ("T. Hood Esq.") supposedly to "Dear Lamb," n.p., n.d. [autumn 1828?]. <I>1 page, small folio, tears, one crossing text without loss, creased, half green morocco slipcase.</I> Lamb writes himself as Hood, beginning cryptically: "You are am impudent varlet, but I will keep your secret." He informs that he will be dining at Ayrlon's on Thursday and intends to stay with Sarah. He adds: "Mrs. M and her Tragedy may be damned so may not you and your rib." -- HOOD, Thomas. Autograph letter signed ("Tho.s Hood") to T. Freiling[?], Winchmore Hill near Enfield, 3 June 1830. <I>2 pages, 8vo, integral blank affixed to a cabinet portrait</I>, half red morocco slipcase.</I> Hood sends Lamb's <I>Specimens of English Dramatic Poets</I>, thinking he "will relish both the samples and the criticisms" and agree that "the fine dramatists of those days were quite worthy of being Shakespeare's playfellows." Together 4 items, enclosed in two morocco slipcases. (3) | Christie's