The Art of Navigation in England, 1958, p. 144 and cf. p. 531). The map of the Atlantic and adjacent coastal regions, showing Spanish trade routes to the West Indies, was first published in the 1545 Arte de navegar. Noteworthy for the vividly red-printed Papal Line of Demarcation dividing the Portuguese and Spanish domains, the map is one of only three Spanish maps printed before the last two years of the 16th century to be listed in Philip Burden's comprehensive survey of North American maps; it was preceded only by the very rare map printed in the Seville 1511 edition of Peter Martyr, Legatio Babylonica, Oceani decas. Provenance: Anonymous owner (sale, Sotheby's New York, October 31, 1985, lot 23). " /> MEDINA, PEDRO DE. Regimiento de Navegacion. Contiene las cosas que los pilotos han de saber para bien navegar. Sevilla: Simon Carpintero, 1563. <I>4to, 208 x 152 mm. (8¼ x 5 15/16 in.), 17th(?)-century limp vellum, traces of ties, edges red-sprinkled, restored and recased; modern half morocco folding case; single small wormhole through text block, short marginal tear to fol. e3, small stain to gutter margin in quire a, occasional minor spotting or soiling, a few leaves foxed or darkened</I>. Second Edition, general title printed in red and black with woodcut of six ships and zephyrs, 6 parts in one (Books 1-5 and Part 2), each part with its own title-page (on rectos or versos) with woodcut illustration or diagram printed in red and black, text within rule border, double-page woodcut map of the Atlantic with adjacent coasts of America, Europe and Africa, printed in red (Burden 14), numerous small woodcut illustrations, many of ships and sailing scenes, and astronomical diagrams, 6-line and smaller floriated woodcut initials, cancel table pasted down on fol. f1v, cancel slip on colophon (i5r) and cancel folio numbers to fols. 65-72. Alden & Landis 563/14 (misdescribing the work as a reprint of the <I>Arte de navegar</I>); Borba de Moraes p. 549; Palau 159667. Enlarged second edition of a classic early work of navigation. Although the <I>Regimiento</I> reprints most of the practical instructions that appeared in Medina's <I>Arte de Navegar</I> of 1545, it is an entirely new work, intended for more direct practical use as a navigational manual for sailors at sea. No doubt because of this heavier usage both editions of the <I>Regimiento</I> are far scarcer than are early editions of the <I>Arte</I>. This greatly expanded second edition almost doubles the size of the first edition of 1552, and includes a new "Segunda Parte" containing instructions particularly relevant for voyages to the New World. One of these two editions was the only practical treatise of navigation listed in Martin Frobisher's inventory of the books brought along on his 1576 voyage in search of the fabled Northwest passage: "The emphasis [of most of the books brought by Frobisher] was on theory. Medina's work, the only navigation manual, was however... particularly good on the practical problems of sights, chart-work, time and tides" (Waters, <I>The Art of Navigation in England</I>, 1958, p. 144 and cf. p. 531). The map of the Atlantic and adjacent coastal regions, showing Spanish trade routes to the West Indies, was first published in the 1545 <I>Arte de navegar</I>. Noteworthy for the vividly red-printed Papal Line of Demarcation dividing the Portuguese and Spanish domains, the map is one of only three Spanish maps printed before the last two years of the 16th century to be listed in Philip Burden's comprehensive survey of North American maps; it was preceded only by the very rare map printed in the Seville 1511 edition of Peter Martyr, <I>Legatio Babylonica, Oceani decas</I>. <I>Provenance</I>: Anonymous owner (sale, Sotheby's New York, October 31, 1985, lot 23). | Christie's