The shingle is made of Rene 41, a nickel-base steel alloy, and served as the outer thermal protection layer of the spacecraft. It was one of two shingles that covered the spacecraft hatch. MA-5 was launched on 29 November 1961 and was the first American spacecraft to orbit the Earth with a living passenger, a chimpanzee named Enos. The successful 3 hour and 21 minute flight served as the final test before John Glenn's historic orbital flight less than 3 months later. Sections of the shingle were removed for post-flight analysis. The "U N" is the beginning of "UNITED" and the "S T" is the beginning of "STATES" which was painted on two places on outer hull. The MA-5 spacecraft currently resides at the North Carolina Museum of Life and Science on loan from the Smithsonian. [With:] Photos of the MA-5 flight showing the hatch shingle and of the spacecraft at the North Carolina Museum. (4) " /> Mercury-Atlas 5 [MA-5] spacecraft hatch shingle. <I>Approx. 11 in. wide at the top, 16 in. wide at the bottom, and 26 in. tall with the letters of "U N" and "S T" painted on the outer side.</I> The shingle is made of Rene 41, a nickel-base steel alloy, and served as the outer thermal protection layer of the spacecraft. It was one of two shingles that covered the spacecraft hatch. MA-5 was launched on 29 November 1961 and was the first American spacecraft to orbit the Earth with a living passenger, a chimpanzee named <I>Enos</I>. The successful 3 hour and 21 minute flight served as the final test before John Glenn's historic orbital flight less than 3 months later. Sections of the shingle were removed for post-flight analysis. The "U N" is the beginning of "UNITED" and the "S T" is the beginning of "STATES" which was painted on two places on outer hull. The MA-5 spacecraft currently resides at the North Carolina Museum of Life and Science on loan from the Smithsonian. [With:] Photos of the MA-5 flight showing the hatch shingle and of the spacecraft at the North Carolina Museum. (4) | Christie's