1½ pages, folio, integral blank, light browning, small stain on page 1, docket pasted over, otherwise in good condition. MONTRÉSOR PLANS TO EXPLORE THE WEST. A very rare letter of one of the foremost surveyors in Colonial America. While surveying the St. Lawrence River region, Montresor is grateful to have been chosen "to attempt the prosecution of a further Discovery of the North Westward most part of North America: which scheme I have and ever had most earnestly at heart," and he is confident "of being able to execute it," though it is a "great and hazardous undertaking." He hopes "I can prevail on Sir Jeffery Amherst, by whom I am at present employed..." He has frequently asked Col. Montresor (his father) "to procure me his Majesty's leave to return to Great Britain," for he has spent eight years "in this country." But for the exploration he proposes recruiting "a number of experienced Rangers and Indians...at Boston" plus "Sea-men, Artificers, Vessels, Craft, Boats and Provision, Clothing, Arms, Ammunition, Instruments, Tools," as required. As to my...Route I refer to superior judgement...I have read minutely every English author that has wrote on this Subject...My only motive, is the advantage of my country...." Apparently, Montrésor's enthusiastic plans for a westward expedition (a precursor of Mackenzie or Lewis & Clarke?) were never realized. Montrésor accompanied his father, an engineer, with his regiment to America in 1754; commissioned Lieutenant, both son and father were participants in Braddock's disastrous 1755 expedition against Fort Du Quesne. He was present at the Quebec seige, designed fortifications near Niagara and Lake Erie. In 1765 Montrésor was named engineer extraordinary, and in 1775, chief engineer in America. In this capacity he served at the Battle of Bunker Hill, Long Island, during the Philadelphia occupation and elsewhere. He is best known for a number of important maps and surveys he completed, including Boston (1775) and New York (1776); many of these were published in engraved form. " /> MONTRÉSOR, John (1736-1788?), <I>British military engineer.</I> Autograph letter signed ("John Montrésor") to James Dalrymple, New York, 28 November 1762. <I>1½ pages, folio, integral blank, light browning, small stain on page 1, docket pasted over,</I> otherwise in good condition. MONTRÉSOR PLANS TO EXPLORE THE WEST. A very rare letter of one of the foremost surveyors in Colonial America. While surveying the St. Lawrence River region, Montresor is grateful to have been chosen "to attempt the prosecution of a further Discovery of the North Westward most part of North America: which scheme I have and ever had most earnestly at heart," and he is confident "of being able to execute it," though it is a "great and hazardous undertaking." He hopes "I can prevail on Sir Jeffery Amherst, by whom I am at present employed..." He has frequently asked Col. Montresor (his father) "to procure me his Majesty's leave to return to Great Britain," for he has spent eight years "in this country." But for the exploration he proposes recruiting "a number of experienced Rangers and Indians...at Boston" plus "Sea-men, Artificers, Vessels, Craft, Boats and Provision, Clothing, Arms, Ammunition, Instruments, Tools," as required. As to my...Route I refer to superior judgement...I have read minutely every English author that has wrote on this Subject...My only motive, is the advantage of my country...." Apparently, Montrésor's enthusiastic plans for a westward expedition (a precursor of Mackenzie or Lewis & Clarke?) were never realized. Montrésor accompanied his father, an engineer, with his regiment to America in 1754; commissioned Lieutenant, both son and father were participants in Braddock's disastrous 1755 expedition against Fort Du Quesne. He was present at the Quebec seige, designed fortifications near Niagara and Lake Erie. In 1765 Montrésor was named engineer extraordinary, and in 1775, chief engineer in America. In this capacity he served at the Battle of Bunker Hill, Long Island, during the Philadelphia occupation and elsewhere. He is best known for a number of important maps and surveys he completed, including Boston (1775) and New York (1776); many of these were published in engraved form. | Christie's