1 p., 4to, light foxing along creases. Buchanan speculates about the Democratic party's election chances in Pennsylvania. "I have always believed that we should carry this State by a fair majority; but I was so much deceived in 1840, & in consequence so much deceived my friends, that I have been very cautious in expressing an opinion throughout the present contest." He thinks the great issue of the campaign is the tariff, and that it is "destined to agitate the Country during the next four years as much as it did in '32 & '33. I have great confidence in the prudence & wisdom of James K. Polk." -- JOHNSON, Andrew (1808-1875). ADS ("Andrew Johnson"), Proclamation, Nashville, 14 November 1856. 2 pp., 4to, blue paper. Gov. Andrew Johnson certifies Tennessee's electoral votes in favor of William H. Polk. -- GARFIELD, James A. (1831-1851) ALS ("J. A. Garfield") to Emett Garfield, his brother, Washington, 15 February 1866. 2 pp., 4to, creased. Garfield offers some stern thoughts about lingering Confederate sympathies in the early postwar period. "No truce can be made with the spirit of rebellion...to fight it to the death is the only way to conquer it or even to secure its respect. Rebels never respected us so much as in battle & never despise us so much as when we attempt to conciliate." -- HAYES, Rutherford B. (1822-1893) ALS, as president, to Mrs. Clinton Locke, Washington, 17 September 1878. 1 p., 8vo, Executive Mansion stationery. Hayes complies with a request for his autograph. -- ARTHUR, Chester A. (1829-1886) ALS ("Chester A. Arthur") as President to Thomas L. Taylor, 25 July 1884. 2 pp., 8vo, on Executive Mansion stationery, with White House envelope addressed in Arthur's hand. A letter of sympathy on the death of Taylor's wife. -- CLEVELAND, Grover (1837-1908). ALS ("Grover Cleveland") to Henry Watterson, New York, 20 March 1890. 4 pp., 8vo, with autograph envelope in Cleveland's hand. Cleveland discusses his personal and political situation: "I am trying to live quietly and modestly. I am in no man's way and striving for nothing but a decent life; but without any affectation I can say, that no man desires to see our party in power again more than I....I never blamed you or anyone else for thinking I was too heedless of personal relations in my public life..." Together 6 items. (6) " /> [PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES]. BUCHANAN, James (1791-1868). ALS ("James Buchanan") to Albert H. Tracy, Lancaster, 4 November 1844. <I>1 p., 4to, light foxing along creases</I>. Buchanan speculates about the Democratic party's election chances in Pennsylvania. "I have always believed that we should carry this State by a fair majority; but I was so much deceived in 1840, & in consequence so much deceived my friends, that I have been very cautious in expressing an opinion throughout the present contest." He thinks the great issue of the campaign is the tariff, and that it is "destined to agitate the Country during the next four years as much as it did in '32 & '33. I have great confidence in the prudence & wisdom of James K. Polk." -- JOHNSON, Andrew (1808-1875). ADS ("Andrew Johnson"), Proclamation, Nashville, 14 November 1856. <I>2 pp., 4to, blue paper</I>. Gov. Andrew Johnson certifies Tennessee's electoral votes in favor of William H. Polk. -- GARFIELD, James A. (1831-1851) ALS ("J. A. Garfield") to Emett Garfield, his brother, Washington, 15 February 1866. <I>2 pp., 4to, creased</I>. Garfield offers some stern thoughts about lingering Confederate sympathies in the early postwar period. "No truce can be made with the spirit of rebellion...to fight it to the death is the only way to conquer it or even to secure its respect. Rebels never respected us so much as in battle & never despise us so much as when we attempt to conciliate." -- HAYES, Rutherford B. (1822-1893) ALS, as president, to Mrs. Clinton Locke, Washington, 17 September 1878. <I>1 p., 8vo, Executive Mansion stationery</I>. Hayes complies with a request for his autograph. -- ARTHUR, Chester A. (1829-1886) ALS ("Chester A. Arthur") as President to Thomas L. Taylor, 25 July 1884. <I>2 pp., 8vo, on Executive Mansion stationery, with White House envelope addressed in Arthur's hand</I>. A letter of sympathy on the death of Taylor's wife. -- CLEVELAND, Grover (1837-1908). ALS ("Grover Cleveland") to Henry Watterson, New York, 20 March 1890. <I>4 pp., 8vo, with autograph envelope in Cleveland's hand</I>. Cleveland discusses his personal and political situation: "I am trying to live quietly and modestly. I am in no man's way and striving for nothing but a decent life; but without any affectation I can say, that no man desires to see our party in power again more than I....I never blamed you or anyone else for thinking I was too heedless of personal relations in my public life..." <I>Together 6 items</I>. (6) | Christie's