1 page, integral address leaf, docketed at corner on verso, partial separation at central fold, even browning, docketed (by Hancock?). PUTNAM TO HANCOCK. The aging veteran of the French and Indian War (see lot 90), from his command in the Hudson Highlands, thanks Hancock for provisions and inquires about the number of troops that will be sent: "Yours of the 3 Inst. I Received, and am much obliged to you for the Provisions made me while commanding at this Department. I have Repeatedly wrote to His Excellency Genl. Washington, respecting the number of Troops which were intended to be stationed here this ensuing winter. Its now Drawing near that Season and a Provision ought to be immediately made." He has gathered building supplies and awaits instruction: "I have found all the Planks & Bricks I could, and should be happy to Receive your Instructions what number of Barracks to Build..." He adds that "I shall be happy in seeing Mrs. Hancock in this Quarter," and promises "all the Service I can render her..." In May 1777 Washington had stationed "Old Put" in the strategic Hudson Highlands, but it was becoming clear that the old hero was past his prime as a field commander. On 6 October, Putnam's greatly diminished forces were routed by a surprise British attack under Clinton. Both Highlands forts, Clinton and Montgomery, fell to the enemy, and the town of Kingston was burned. " /> PUTNAM, Israel (1718-1790), <I>Major General.</I> Letter signed ("Israel Putnam") TO JOHN HANCOCK, "President of the Continental Congress at Philadelphia;" n.p. [Hudson Highlands], n.d. [summer 1777]. <I>1 page, integral address leaf, docketed at corner on verso, partial separation at central fold, even browning, docketed (by Hancock?).</I> PUTNAM TO HANCOCK. The aging veteran of the French and Indian War (see lot 90), from his command in the Hudson Highlands, thanks Hancock for provisions and inquires about the number of troops that will be sent: "Yours of the 3 Inst. I Received, and am much obliged to you for the Provisions made me while commanding at this Department. I have Repeatedly wrote to His Excellency Genl. Washington, respecting the number of Troops which were intended to be stationed here this ensuing winter. Its now Drawing near that Season and a Provision ought to be immediately made." He has gathered building supplies and awaits instruction: "I have found all the Planks & Bricks I could, and should be happy to Receive your Instructions what number of Barracks to Build..." He adds that "I shall be happy in seeing Mrs. Hancock in this Quarter," and promises "all the Service I can render her..." In May 1777 Washington had stationed "Old Put" in the strategic Hudson Highlands, but it was becoming clear that the old hero was past his prime as a field commander. On 6 October, Putnam's greatly diminished forces were routed by a surprise British attack under Clinton. Both Highlands forts, Clinton and Montgomery, fell to the enemy, and the town of Kingston was burned. | Christie's